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Browse All : Images of Turkey

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Jerusalem and the Dead Sea, Middle East
Jerusalem and the Dead ...
12/21/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS002-E-7758 (28 June 2001) --- View of the Dardanelles, Turkey, as photographed with a digital still camera aboard the International Space Station (ISS).
International Space Sta...
2005-04-15 0:0:0
 
Description ISS010-E-08224 (22 November 2004) --- Mount Olympus, Greece is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 10 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Mount Olympus is the highest peak (2917 meters) in Greece, as well as the mountain chain that runs north into Bulgaria and south, via the Cyclades Islands, into Turkey. In this winter view, Olympus is the only peak with a dusting of snow?perhaps for this reason its name in classical Greek means ?the luminous one.? In Greek mythology the peak was inhabited by the Twelve Olympians, the most famous gods of the ancient Greeks. North of Mount Olympus lies Macedonia, the homeland of Alexander the Great. Climbing the mountain is a favorite tourist activity today. The slopes of the peaks of Olympus and its neighboring peaks drop sheer into the Thermaikos Gulf, a northern arm of the Aegean Sea. White cirrus clouds obscure the shoreline near the city of Thessaloniki. This major port is spread along the shores of a small and well protected bay at the north end of the gulf. On the plains inland of the Olympus chain lie a lake, on the Aliakmon River, and the town of Larisa, at the focus point of a series of transport routes.
International Space Sta...
2006-03-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-21343 (29 Mar. 2006) --- The shadow of the moon falls on Earth as seen from the International Space Station, 230 miles above the planet, during a total solar eclipse at about 4:50 a.m. CST Wednesday, March 29. This digital photo was taken by the Expedition 12 crew, Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev, who are wrapping up a six-month mission on the complex. Visible near the shadow are portions of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea and the coast of Turkey.
International Space Sta...
2004-05-24 0:0:0
 
Description ISS008-E-21752 (16 April 2004) --- This image featuring Istanbul, Turkey was photographed by an Expedition 8 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). This metropolis of 15 million occupies both sides of the entrance to the narrow, 20-mile long Bosporus Strait connecting the Mediterranean and Sea of Marmara (south) to the Black Sea (north). When this image was taken, strong currents carried turbid coastal waters from the Black Sea through the Strait and into the Sea of Marmara. The rugged uplands to the north of the city are forested and contain vital reservoirs. Note Ataturk airport southwest of the city near the bottom of the image, the picturesque Prince Islands in the Sea of Marmara, and the sinuous waterway and harbor on the western shore known as the Golden Horn.
International Space Sta...
2007-01-29 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-08138 (9 Nov. 2006) --- Gallipoli and Dardanelles Strait, Turkey are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city of Gallipoli (or Gelibolu in Turkish) sits at a crossroads between the Marmara and Aegean Seas, connected by the Dardanelles Strait. According to scientists, the strait is a 61 kilometer-long drowned fault valley formed during tectonic activity during the Tertiary period as the Arabian, Indian, and African plates collided with the Eurasian plate. This faulting, which formed the great mountain ranges of the Alps and Himalayas, also created the rugged terrain of western Turkey visible in the lower half of this image. Plate collision continues today, leading to frequent strike-slip (side-by-side relative motion along a fault, rather than up or down motion) earthquakes in the region as Turkey moves westward in relation to Eurasia (sometimes called escape tectonics). The urbanized area of modern Gallipoli is visible as a light gray to pink region at the entrance to the Dardanelles Strait. Water in the Strait flows in both northeast and southwest directions due to opposite surface and undercurrents. Several ships are visible in the Strait to the southwest of Gallipoli (center left).
STS-100 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS100-E-5382 (26 April 2001) --- The northeast part of Lake Van (Van Golu) in Turkey was photographed with a digital still camera by the crew members aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on April 26, 2001.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S106-E-5074 (10 September 2000) --- This south-looking view from the Space Shuttle Atlantis, flying above Turkey, features the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) on Flight Day 3 of the scheduled 11-day STS-106 mission.
STS-73 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS073-723-054 (20 OCTOBER - 5 NOVEMBER 1995) --- Central Turkey dominates this north-looking panorama, with the long fingered island of Cyprus lower left, surrounded by the deep blue waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Turkey's capital, Ankara, lies just north of the white bed of a dry lake in the center of the view. The city is supplied with water from the neighboring blue lake. The coast of Syria and Lebanon appear bottom right. Man-made lakes on the upper Euphrates River in eastern Turkey appear extreme right.. According to scientists studying the STS-73 photo collection, the striking difference in visibility to north and south of Turkey suggests a pollution event over the Black Sea. Air pollution from East European industry flows down into the Black Sea basin, especially at the west end (haze top left) as shown in this view (compare clearer air top right).
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-781-053 Lake Van, Turkey September 1996 Lake Van, the largest lake in the country of Turkey, can be seen in this southwest-looking low-oblique view. Located in eastern Turkey, Lake Van is a saline lake with no outlet. Lake Van is fed by numerous small streams, which descend from the surrounding mountains. The lake measures 75 miles (120 km) long, 50 miles (80 km) wide and covers an area of 1450 sq. miles (3755 sq. km). The waters of Lake Van are rich in sodium carbonate and other salts which are extracted by evaporation and used as detergents. The brackish waters support only one species of fish. The smaller Ercek Lake can be seen to the left of Lake Van in the lower left quadrant of the image. Agricultural fields can be seen in the valleys of rivers that flow into Lake Van. To the right of Lake Van near the right center of the image, the extinct Suphan Volcano at 13314 feet (4061 meters) is discernible.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-782-050 The Island of Cyprus September 1996 Covering an area of 3578 sq. miles (9267 sq. km) and located in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, the island of Cyprus can be seen in this northeast-looking view. Cyprus is located 40 miles (60 km) south of Turkey and 60 miles (100 km) west of Syria. There are three main geographic regions on Cyprus. The Troodos Massif, consisting of mostly volcanic rock and some limestone, traverses the southwest portion of the island (darker feature near the center of the image). Iron and copper pyrites are found in the foothills and asbestos and chromium in the higher slopes of the Troodos. The highest elevation in the massif is 6406 feet (1953 meters). Numerous government-owned forests cover the Troodos Massif. On the north coast is the Kyrenia Range, a narrow mountain range reaching elevations of 3000 feet (1000 meters). Consisting mainly of limestone, the range is wooded. Between the two mountain ranges is the Central Plain, where seventy percent of the island?s agriculture is located. The capital city of Cyprus, Nicosia, is situated on the Central Plain. The plain consists of a limestone crust and is considered a flat tableland. Heavily forested in ancient times, today the plain is almost treeless.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS096-330-004 (30 May 1999) --- Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, mission specialist, is backdropped over the Aegian Sea as she handles the American-built crane which she later helped to install on the International Space Station (ISS) during the May 30 space walk. Jernigan's feet are anchored to a mobile foot restraint connected to the Discovery's Canadian-built remote manipulator system (RMS). Jernigan was joined by astronaut Daniel T. Barry for the lengthy extravehicular activity (EVA). Parts of Greece, Turkey and the Dardenelles are visible some 171 nautical miles below the docked tandem of Discovery and the ISS.
STS-109 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS109-708-024 (1-12 March 2002) --- The astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia took this 70mm picture featuring the Sinai Peninsula and the Dead Sea Rift. The left side of the view is dominated by the great triangle of the Sinai peninsula, which is partly obscured by an unusual cloud mass on this day. The famous Monastery of St. Catherine lies in the very remote, rugged mountains in the southern third of the peninsula (foreground). The Gulf of Aqaba is a finger of the Red Sea bottom center, pointing north to the Dead Sea, the small body of water near the center of the view. According to NASA scientists studying the STS-109 photo collection, the gulf and the Dead Sea are northerly extensions of the same geological rift that resulted in the opening of the Red Sea . The Gulf of Suez appears in the lower left corner. Northwest Saudi Arabia occupies the lower right side of the view, Jordan and Syria the right and top right, and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea the top left. Thin white lines of cloud have formed along the coastal mountains of southern Turkey and stretch across the top of the view near the Earth's limb.
STS-113 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS113-348-012 (3 December 2002) --- The STS-113 crewmembers used a 35mm still camera to record this image of a mid latitude storm system. The counter-clockwise swirl shows that this is a northern hemisphere storm. The storm was northeast of the Mediterranean Sea, covering the Balkans and western Turkey. The view was taken looking northwest in the early afternoon of Dec 3, 2002.
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