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Browse All : Images of Utah

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Ares Training
Ares Training
3/23/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Salt Lake City, Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah
9/28/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
Stardust Trajectory
Stardust Trajectory
11/22/95
NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
Year 1995
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS004-E-10119 (17 April 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis flies over Lake Powell and Utah landscape not long after its separation from the International Space Station (ISS). One of the Expedition Four crew members on board the orbital outpost used a digital still camera to record this view on April 17, 2002.
International Space Sta...
2004-06-04 0:0:0
 
Description ISS005-E-16729 (7 October 2002) --- Great Salt Lake, Utah, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 5 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). Great Salt Lake serves as a striking visual marker for crewmembers orbiting over North America. A sharp line across its center is caused by the restriction in water flow from the railroad causeway. The eye-catching colors of the lake stem from the fact that Great Salt Lake is hyper saline, typically 3-5 times saltier than the ocean, and the high salinities support sets of plants and animals that affect the light-absorbing qualities of the water. North of the causeway salinities are higher, and the water turns red from the pigments of halophilic bacteria. In the shallower corner of the lake, earthen dikes mark large salt evaporation works, which take on the jewel tones of turquoise, russet, tamber and pearl white.
International Space Sta...
2005-11-04 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-05172 (14 October 2005) --- Navajo Mountain, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crewmember on the international space station. According to scientists, the Colorado Plateau of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah is characterized by mostly flat-lying sedimentary layers that record paleoclimate extremes ranging from oceans to widespread deserts over the last 1.8 billion years. Navajo Mountain is formed by a dome-shaped body of igneous rock (called a laccolith by geologists), one of several in southeast Utah that intrude and uplift the surrounding sedimentary layers of the Plateau. This oblique image highlights Navajo Mountain in the center of the image, surrounded by light red-brown Navajo Sandstone (also visible in canyons at bottom of image). Scientists believe the peak of Navajo Mountain, at approximately 3148 meters (10,388 feet) elevation, is comprised of uplifted Dakota Sandstone deposited during the Cretaceous Period. The establishment of Rainbow Bridge National Monument (1910), and the filling of Glen Canyon by Lake Powell in 1963 (upper right), have facilitated tourism and aesthetic appreciation of this previously remote region. Access to Navajo Mountain is still regulated by the sovereign Navajo Nation, and the process of permitting is required to hike in the region.
International Space Sta...
2005-10-28 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-13889 (30 September 2005) --- Wasatch Range, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station. The Wasatch Range forms an impressive backdrop to the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, and is a frequent destination for hikers, backpackers, and skiers. The range is considered to be the westernmost part of the Rocky Mountains, and rises to elevations of approximately 3600 meters (12,000 feet) above sea level. This photograph, taken at the end of September, captures red- (maple trees) and gold-mantled (aspen trees) hill slopes along the western mountain front to the south of Salt Lake City. Other common tree species at these elevations include pine, fir, spruce, willow, birch, and oak. A portion of Draper City is visible in the left half of the image. The elevation of Lone Peak, visible at upper right, is approximately 3410 meters (11,253 feet).
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-07360 (14 June 2003) --- This regional view of Salt Lake City, Utah taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station (ISS) shows the city and its suburbs nestled between the Wasatch Front and the Great Salt Lake. The core of Interstate Highway 15 runs North-South through the valley, with suburbs arrayed east and west of the highway. An important issue facing Salt Lake City?s growing population is preservation and allocation of water resources. Utah is in its fifth year of drought. One of the most dramatic effects of the drought visible in this picture is the fact that the lake levels are so low that Antelope Island is separated from the mainland by dry lakebed. Expansive productive wetlands occur where freshwater flows from the Wasatch Range and into the lake. The southern end of this network of wetlands can be seen in the image.
International Space Sta...
2007-07-24 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-17052 (5 July 2007) --- The Great Salt Lake in Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2007-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-22276 (13 Aug. 2007) --- Smoke plumes from wide-spread fires across Idaho, Utah and Montana are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-118) was docked with the station. Looking westward toward the horizon, this image covers an expanse from northern Utah to central Idaho with southwest Montana in the foreground.
International Space Sta...
2007-10-01 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-28004 (12 Sept. 2007) --- A section of Dinosaur National Monument along the Yampa River in Colorado, which straddles the Colorado/Utah border, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Dinosaur National Monument is perhaps best known for the abundant fossils found in the approximately 145 Ma (mega-annum, or millions of years old) Morrison Formation exposed in valleys and low ridges, according to scientists. The fossil assemblage is a unique record of terrestrial life of the period (dinosaurs, plants, and other animal species). Remains accumulated in streams and shallow lakes and were swiftly buried (and preserved) by sediments associated with those environments. Scientists believe these sediments in turn were lithified over many millions of years as they were buried under younger deposits -- forming the distinctive stratigraphy of the Monument. The generally flat-laying "layer cake" geology of the region -- similar to the Colorado Plateau to the south - is expressed in the image by parallel beds of tan, reddish-brown, and gray-brown sedimentary rocks cut by the Yampa River at the northern end of the Monument (top). Erosion by the Yampa River exposed the Morrison layer and its trove of fossil material. Together with other fossils found in both older and younger rock layers in the area, the Dinosaur National Monument remains an important scientific resource that continues to provide new insights into the geologic history and paleoecology of the region.
International Space Sta...
2007-10-01 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-28001 (12 Sept. 2007) --- A section of Dinosaur National Monument along the Yampa River in Colorado, which straddles the Colorado/Utah border, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Dinosaur National Monument is perhaps best known for the abundant fossils found in the approximately 145 Ma (mega-annum, or millions of years old) Morrison Formation exposed in valleys and low ridges, according to scientists. The fossil assemblage is a unique record of terrestrial life of the period (dinosaurs, plants, and other animal species). Remains accumulated in streams and shallow lakes and were swiftly buried (and preserved) by sediments associated with those environments. Scientists believe these sediments in turn were lithified over many millions of years as they were buried under younger deposits -- forming the distinctive stratigraphy of the Monument. The generally flat-laying "layer cake" geology of the region -- similar to the Colorado Plateau to the south - is expressed in the image by parallel beds of tan, reddish-brown, and gray-brown sedimentary rocks cut by the Yampa River at the northern end of the Monument (top). Erosion by the Yampa River exposed the Morrison layer and its trove of fossil material. Together with other fossils found in both older and younger rock layers in the area, the Dinosaur National Monument remains an important scientific resource that continues to provide new insights into the geologic history and paleoecology of the region.
International Space Sta...
2007-10-01 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-28002 (12 Sept. 2007) --- A section of Dinosaur National Monument along the Yampa River in Colorado, which straddles the Colorado/Utah border, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Dinosaur National Monument is perhaps best known for the abundant fossils found in the approximately 145 Ma (mega-annum, or millions of years old) Morrison Formation exposed in valleys and low ridges, according to scientists. The fossil assemblage is a unique record of terrestrial life of the period (dinosaurs, plants, and other animal species). Remains accumulated in streams and shallow lakes and were swiftly buried (and preserved) by sediments associated with those environments. Scientists believe these sediments in turn were lithified over many millions of years as they were buried under younger deposits -- forming the distinctive stratigraphy of the Monument. The generally flat-laying "layer cake" geology of the region -- similar to the Colorado Plateau to the south - is expressed in the image by parallel beds of tan, reddish-brown, and gray-brown sedimentary rocks cut by the Yampa River at the northern end of the Monument (top). Erosion by the Yampa River exposed the Morrison layer and its trove of fossil material. Together with other fossils found in both older and younger rock layers in the area, the Dinosaur National Monument remains an important scientific resource that continues to provide new insights into the geologic history and paleoecology of the region.
International Space Sta...
2007-10-01 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-28003 (12 Sept. 2007) --- A section of Dinosaur National Monument along the Yampa River in Colorado, which straddles the Colorado/Utah border, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Dinosaur National Monument is perhaps best known for the abundant fossils found in the approximately 145 Ma (mega-annum, or millions of years old) Morrison Formation exposed in valleys and low ridges, according to scientists. The fossil assemblage is a unique record of terrestrial life of the period (dinosaurs, plants, and other animal species). Remains accumulated in streams and shallow lakes and were swiftly buried (and preserved) by sediments associated with those environments. Scientists believe these sediments in turn were lithified over many millions of years as they were buried under younger deposits -- forming the distinctive stratigraphy of the Monument. The generally flat-laying "layer cake" geology of the region -- similar to the Colorado Plateau to the south - is expressed in the image by parallel beds of tan, reddish-brown, and gray-brown sedimentary rocks cut by the Yampa River at the northern end of the Monument (top). Erosion by the Yampa River exposed the Morrison layer and its trove of fossil material. Together with other fossils found in both older and younger rock layers in the area, the Dinosaur National Monument remains an important scientific resource that continues to provide new insights into the geologic history and paleoecology of the region.
International Space Sta...
2007-10-22 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-29867 (20 Sept. 2007) --- Bingham Canyon Mine, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. The Bingham Canyon Mine (center) located approximately 32 kilometers to the southeast of Salt Lake City, UT is one of the largest open-pit mines in the world, measuring over 4 kilometers wide and 1,200 meters deep. The mine exploits a porphyry copper, a type of geological structure formed by crystal-rich magma moving upwards through pre-existing rock layers. As the magma cools and crystallizes (forming an igneous rock with large crystals in a fine-grained matrix, known as a porphyry), hot fluids circulate through the magma and surrounding rocks via fractures. This process of hydrothermal alteration typically forms copper-bearing and other minerals in spatial patterns that a geologist recognizes as a potential porphyry copper deposit. Parallel benches (stepped terraces), visible along the western pit face (center left), range from 16 to 25 meters high - these provide access for equipment to work the rock face, as well as maintaining stability of the sloping pit walls. A dark, larger roadway is also visible directly below the benches. Brown to gray, flat topped hills of gangue (waste rock) surround the pit, and are thrown into sharp relief by shadows and the oblique viewing angle of this image. Leachate reservoirs associated with ore processing are visible to the south of the city of Bingham Canyon, UT (right).
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
2005-08-19 0:0:0
 
Description STS114-E-5455 (27 July 2005) --- This digital still camera frame, showing the Great Salt Lake and Salt Lake City, is one of a series of photos of both domestic and world-wide targets of opportunity captured by the STS-114 astronauts. Salt Lake City is in the upper half of the photo between the Great Salt Lake and the smaller Lake Utah. A 28 mm lens was used to record the image.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS090-E-5092 (22 April 1998) --- Part of the snow-capped Wasatch Front Range is pictured in this spring time view over Utah, as photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. The water on the left side of the frame is part of the eastern side of Utah Lake. The city of Provo is visible at the bottom of the frame, with the airport visible near the lake. The picture was taken an electronic still camera (ESC) at 21:19:31 GMT, April 22, 1998.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-811-019 Yellowstone Area, Wyoming September, 1996 The Yellowstone area, one of the most geologically unique regions in the world, can be seen in this synoptic generally west-looking low-oblique view. The majority of the area is located atop a geothermal ?hotspot? in the mantle of the earth, a geologic layer just below the earth?s crust. This concentrated hotspot under the earth provides the heat necessary to drive the incredible hydrothermal features and volcanic activity. The world?s greatest concentration of geysers and hot springs are situated here in the Yellowstone area. A large caldera, which is caused by a collapsed volcano, exists in the southern portion of Yellowstone and is the remnant of a major volcanic eruption that occurred about 1.2 million years ago. Yellowstone Lake, (small and very dark blue) just to the right and slightly above the center of the image, is the largest high mountain lake in North America and fills part of the huge caldera. Other features visible in this view include the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole (to the left of Yellowstone Lake); the Absaroka Range (to the east or right of Yellowstone Lake); and the Wind River Range (extending southeastward or below the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole). The Bighorn Mountains of north central Wyoming are discernible in the lower right portion of the image. Between the Bighorn Mountains and the Yellowstone area is the Bighorn Basin. Near the bottom center of the image is the Great Divide Basin. In the bottom left portion of the image are the Uinta Mountains of northern Utah. Bear Lake and the northern Wasatch Range are visible near the left center of the image. Just to the west of the Wasatch Range, the northern portion of the Great Salt Lake is discernible. Extending westward from the Yellowstone area toward the upper left of the image is the Snake River Plain of eastern Idaho.
STS-100 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS100-716-176 (19 April - 1 May 2001)--- The deeply entrenched, meandering Colorado River is distinctively dark as the river winds its way across the arid terrain of southeast Utah in this 70mm frame photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. While Glen Canyon Dam (bottom of image) is located in northern Arizona, the reservoir of Lake Powell is in Utah. The Escalante and San Juan Rivers, two major tributaries that flow into Lake Powell (from the northwest and east respectively) are also discernable. The darker-looking, elongated and elevated feature north of Lake Powell is the Kaiparowits Plateau. Navajo Mountain is the darker circular feature to the south (to the right) of the lake.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS112-708-002 (7-18 October 2002) --- This image, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis, covers parts of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho. The Front Range of the Rockies is the dark range crossing the bottom of the view, with Denver and neighboring cities (grays) situated in the gentle embayment of the mountains (bottom center of the view). Great Salt Lake in Utah appears as two colors of blue top left, with the snow-covered Uinta Mountains just below, in this northwesterly view. Most of the view encompasses the brown plains of western Wyoming (center) and the cluster of mountains around Yellowstone (top center, top right, with snow). Beyond the brown Snake River Plain, black rocks of the Sawtooth Mountains and neighboring ranges of central Idaho appear top center.
International Space Sta...
2007-07-16 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-05815 (30 April 2007) --- Algae in Great Salt Lake, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. According to scientists, the Great Salt Lake of northern Utah is a remnant of glacial Lake Bonneville that extended over much of present-day western Utah, and into the neighboring states of Nevada and Idaho, approximately 32,000 to 14,000 years ago. During this time, the peaks of adjacent ranges such as the Promontory and Lakeside Mountains were most likely islands. As climate warmed and precipitation decreased in the region, glaciers that fed melt-water to Lake Bonneville disappeared, and the lake began to dry up. The present-day Great Salt Lake is a terminal lake in that water does not flow out of the lake basin. Water loss through the year is due primarily to evaporation, and when this loss exceeds input of water from rivers, streams, precipitation, and groundwater the lake level decreases. This is particularly evident during droughts. This process of evaporation, together with the relatively shallow water levels (maximum lake depth is around 33 feet), has led to increased salinity (dissolved salt content) of the lake waters. The north arm of the Lake, displayed in this image, typically has twice the salinity of the rest of the lake due to impoundment of water by a railroad causeway that crosses the lake from east to west. This restriction of water flow has led to a striking division in the types of algae and bacteria found in the north and south arms of the lake. In the northern arm (north of the causeway), the red algae Dunaliella Salina and the bacterial species Halo bacterium produce a pronounced reddish cast to the water, whereas the south arm (south of the causeway) is dominated by green algae such as Dunaliella viridis. The Great Salt Lake also supports brine shrimp and brine flies; and is a major stopover point for migratory birds including avocets, stilts, and plovers.
International Space Sta...
2007-06-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-08879 (18 May 2007) --- An evaporation pond near the Colorado River in Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station.
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