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Browse All : Images of Venezuela

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International Space Sta...
2006-02-09 0:0:0
 
Description ISS012-E-11779 (8 Dec. 2005) --- Ciudad Guayana, Venezuela is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 12 crew member on the International Space Station. Ciudad Guayana lies on the south bank of the Orinoco River, the second largest in South America, at its confluence with the Caron? (lower left) River. Islands have developed in the Orinoco at a wide sector opposite the city. Guayana is one of the newest cities in Venezuela, having been constructed in 1961 as a new economic growth center for the interior of Venezuela, especially for major industries such as iron, steel, and aluminum. The city stretches 40 kilometers along the south bank of the Orinoco with a population of approximately 800,000 people, one of Venezuela?s largest urban populations. A low barrage (lower left) dams the Caron? as a water supply for the city. The Orinoco River carries brown muddy sediment produced by erosion of the young Andes Mountains far to the southwest. By contrast, the Caron? drains the ancient landscapes of the Guyana Highlands where erosion is so slow that the river water is clear (appearing dark blue) due to a significantly lower sediment load. As at the famous confluence of the brown Amazon and clear Negro rivers in Amazonia, a mixing zone can be seen in the middle of the view, the clear Caron? water producing a less muddy zone for tens of kilometers downstream of the confluence (this part of the Orinoco flows almost due east, left to right).
International Space Sta...
2007-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description ISS014-E-14618 (23 Feb. 2007) --- Maracaibo City and Oil Slick, Venezuela are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. This view depicts the narrow (6 kilometers) strait between Lake Maracaibo to the south and the Gulf of Venezuela to the north. This brackish lake in northern Venezuela is the largest in South America. The lake and its small basin are situated atop a vast reservoir of buried oil deposits, first tapped in 1914. Venezuela is now the world's fifth largest oil producer. The narrow strait is deepened to allow access by ocean-going vessels, dozens of which now daily transport approximately 80 per cent of Venezuela's oil to world markets. Shipping is one of the main polluters of the lake, caused by the dumping of ballast and other waste. An oil slick, likely related to bilge pumping, can be seen as a bright streak northeast of El Triunfo. Other sources of pollution to the lake include underwater oil pipeline leakage, untreated municipal and industrial waste from coastal cities, and runoff of chemicals from surrounding farm land. Deepening the narrow channel for shipping has also allowed saltwater intrusion into the lake, leading to adverse effects to Lake Biota. Since the discovery of oil, cities like Maracaibo have sprung up along the northwestern coastline of the lake. With satellite cities such as San Luis and El Triunfo, greater Maracaibo has a population of approximately 2.5 million. Just outside the lower margin of the picture a major bridge spans the narrows pictured here, connecting cities such as Altagracia (top right) to Maracaibo.
International Space Sta...
2007-11-27 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-07771 (12 May 2007) --- Isla Blanquilla, Venezuela is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. The small island of Blanquilla is so named for its white sand beaches, visible in this image as a bright border along the northeastern -- eastern shoreline. Located approximately 292 kilometers (182 miles) northeast of Caracas, this Caribbean island is a popular destination for divers and tourists arriving by boat or airplane (the airstrip is visible at left center). Surface currents extending from the western coastline of the island (right center) are caused by easterly trade winds. According to scientists, this dominant wind has also caused movement of beach sand to form white "fingers" extending inland along the east coast (bottom center). The flora and fauna of Isla Blanquilla are an interesting mixture of arid (cacti, iguanas) and introduced species (wild donkeys and goats), but it is particularly notable for the presence of black coral. Black coral (order Antipatharia) is something of a misnomer, as it refers to the skeleton of the coral rather than the living organism (which is typically brightly colored). Black corals around the world are harvested for use in jewelry and other craftwork, so much so that the species has been listed for protection under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. The island is the southernmost subaerial (above water) exposure of the Aves Ridge, a seafloor topography feature of the southernmost Caribbean ocean. The western third of the island is comprised of Cretaceous to Paleocene granitic rock (brown to tan), while the remainder consists of three limestone terraces of Pleistocene age deposited on the older granitic basement rock. The terraces decrease in age outwards from the western third of the island. The terraces record fluctuating sea levels, thought to be related to glacial advances and retreats during the Pleistocene together with tectonic uplift of the island.
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