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The Earth passed through a stream of solar wind that flowed out of this expansive coronal hole (seen in lower central area of the Sun in still on January 14, 2006). Coronal holes appear as a dark area of the Sun when viewed in ultraviolet light (as it is here) and in X-rays. Since coronal holes are 'open' magnetically, strong solar wind gusts can escape from them and carry solar particles out to our magnetosphere and beyond. Solar wind streams take several days to travel from the Sun to Earth, and the coronal holes in which they originate are more likely to affect Earth after they have rotated more than halfway around the visible hemisphere of the Sun (see 6-day video clip). Coronal holes are responsible for the high-speed solar wind streams that sweep through the plane where the planets orbit -- and thus have a direct affect on "space weather" near the Earth. The SOHO CELIAS proton monitor saw an increase in solar wind speed from ~ 300 km/s (as low as it usually gets) to nearly 700 km/s associated with this hole. There were reports that sky-watchers in Wisconsin had seen mild auroral displays caused by this coronal hole and it is likely that more aurora will be observed. This is our magnetic connection to the Sun
The Earth passed throug...
Image
 
Description The Earth passed through a stream of solar wind that flowed out of this expansive coronal hole (seen in lower central area of the Sun in still on January 14, 2006). Coronal holes appear as a dark area of the Sun when viewed in ultraviolet light (as it is here) and in X-rays. Since coronal holes are 'open' magnetically, strong solar wind gusts can escape from them and carry solar particles out to our magnetosphere and beyond. Solar wind streams take several days to travel from the Sun to Earth, and the coronal holes in which they originate are more likely to affect Earth after they have rotated more than halfway around the visible hemisphere of the Sun (see 6-day video clip). Coronal holes are responsible for the high-speed solar wind streams that sweep through the plane where the planets orbit -- and thus have a direct affect on "space weather" near the Earth. The SOHO CELIAS proton monitor saw an increase in solar wind speed from ~ 300 km/s (as low as it usually gets) to nearly 700 km/s associated with this hole. There were reports that sky-watchers in Wisconsin had seen mild auroral displays caused by this coronal hole and it is likely that more aurora will be observed. This is our magnetic connection to the Sun
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2008-02-15 0:0:0
 
Chandra X-ray Image wit...
 
Severe Weather in the US Midwest
Severe Weather in the U...
A stationary front drap...
TRMM
 
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-07652 (July 2003) --- Part of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, site of a very popular air show, held around this time of year, was photographed by a crew member aboard the International Space Station during its seventh habitation mission. The airfield near Lake Winnebago hosts the mid-summer fly-in event sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA).
International Space Sta...
2007-08-06 0:0:0
 
Description ISS015-E-05483 (28 April 2007) --- Brooklyn, New York waterfront is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. This view illustrates the dense urban fabric of Brooklyn, New York City's largest borough (population of 2.6 million), characterized by the regular pattern of highly reflective building rooftops (white). Two main arteries from Manhattan into Brooklyn, the famous Brooklyn Bridge and neighboring Manhattan Bridge, cross the East River along the left (north) side of the image. The dense built-up fabric contrasts with the East River and Upper New York Bay (bottom center) waterfront areas, recognizable by docks and large industrial loading facilities that extend across the bottom center from left to right. Much of the shipping traffic has moved to the New Jersey side of New York Bay--this has spurred dismantling and redevelopment of the historic dockyards and waterfront warehouses into residential properties. However, efforts to conserve historic buildings are also ongoing. The original name for Brooklyn, Breukelen, means "broken land" in Dutch--perhaps in recognition of the highly mixed deposits (boulders, sand, silt, and clay) left behind by the Wisconsin glacier between 20,000--90,000 years ago, according to scientists. These deposits form much of Long Island, of which Brooklyn occupies the western tip. This image features one of Brooklyn's largest green spaces, the Green-Wood Cemetery. Today, the cemetery functions as both a natural park and a place of internment. The green tree canopy of the Cemetery contrasts sharply with the surrounding urban land cover, is an Audubon Sanctuary, and provides the final resting place for many 19th and 20th century New York celebrities. Also visible in the image is Governor's Island, which served as a strategic military installation for the US Army (1783--1966) and a major US Coast Guard installation (1966--1996). Today the historic fortifications on the island and their surroundings comprise the Governors Island National Monument.
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