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Browse All : Images of Wyoming

1-11 of 11
International Space Sta...
2005-09-14 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-10575 (15 July 2005) --- Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the International Space Station. According to scientists, huge volcanic eruptions that occurred over the past 2 million years formed Yellowstone National Park?s striking landscape. Two eruptions from 1.2 million and 600,000 years ago ejected more than 1,000 cubic kilometers (240 cubic miles) of material each, making them among the largest volcanic eruptions known in the Earth?s geologic record. At the same time, the emptying of the magma chambers beneath Yellowstone created large surface depressions called calderas. The youngest caldera measures nearly 80 kilometers (50 miles) long by 50 kilometers (31 miles) wide. Thought by most geologists to be the current location of a ?hot spot? of upwelling hot material from Earth?s mantle, the continuing activity of the region is demonstrated by its geysers, hot springs, and boiling mud pots. This image is centered on Yellowstone Lake, a popular camping and fishing location within the National Park. The lake basin includes part of the youngest caldera and has an area of 352 square kilometers (136 square miles). Due to the rise and fall of resurgent domes (the locations of volcanic vents) located nearby, the lake basin is now tilted southwards, causing beaches to grow along the northern shore and flooding to occur in the southern arms of the lake. Scientists believe that the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake was formed by an eruption that occurred approximately 150,000 years ago. The resulting relatively small caldera was subsequently filled with water and joined with the larger lake to the east. Numerous geothermal features such as geysers and hot springs are located in the West Thumb area ? this is thought to be due to a relatively shallow local magma source. A more recent change to Yellowstone?s geography is the area covered by large fire scars ? cleared areas burned during the vast 1988 forest fires. The scars are still highly visible 17 years later because the light-colored cleared regions contrast with the surrounding forest.
International Space Sta...
2005-10-18 0:0:0
 
Description ISS011-E-12863 (11 September 2005) --- North Antelope Rochelle Coal Mine, Wyoming is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crewmember on the international space station. This area, according to NASA scientists studying the Expedition 11 photos, is a major coal producer.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description ISS007-E-17557 (17 October 2003) --- This sweeping view of the Rocky Mountains and the western US was taken when the International Space Station (ISS) traveled over eastern Washington on October 17, 2003. The POV of the Station was looking southeast over the mountains of Idaho (foreground) and Wyoming (Yellowstone, the Tetons and the Wind River Range are just right and above the center of the image). Great Salt Lake is in the lower right of the image.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-06-22 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-18632 (6-17 February 2006) --- Three NASA astronauts participate in training in the Absaroka Mountains of northwest Wyoming. From the left are astronauts Clayton C. Anderson, Sunita L. Williams and Rex J. Walheim.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-06-16 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-18635 (6-17 February 2006) --- A group of international astronauts participates in training in the Absaroka Mountains of northwest Wyoming. Pictured near their base camp, from the left (kneeling), are astronauts Edward T. Lu, Koichi Wakata and Robert B. Thirsk; and (standing) Rex J. Walheim, Sunita L. Williams and Clayton C. Anderson. Thirsk is with the Canadian Space Agency and Wakata represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-06-16 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-18633 (6-17 February 2006) --- Astronaut Clayton C. Anderson participates in training in the Absaroka Mountains of northwest Wyoming.
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-06-16 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-18634 (6-17 February 2006) --- From the left, astronauts Edward T. Lu, Sunita L. Williams and Clayton C. Anderson build a snow shelter during training in the Absaroka Mountains of northwest Wyoming.
STS-90 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS090-E-5095 (22 April 1998) --- This oblique (north-looking) view is over Yellowstone National Park in the northwest corner of Wyoming. The STS-90 frame, from the Space Shuttle Columbia, shows a part of Earth seldom seen from space because of the lower degree of inclination of most of the shuttle flights. Yellowstone Lake is in the center of the frame. The photograph was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 21:20:04 GMT, April 22,1998.
Exploration Imagery
2007-05-15 0:0:0
 
Description S95-01566 (February 1995) --- (Artist's concept of possible exploration programs.) Two kilometers above the lava flows of Mars' Tharsis Bulge region, a geologist collects samples from the eastern cliff at the base of Olympus Mons, the solar system's largest known shield volcano. To better understand the evolution of the Arizona-sized volcano, the scientist investigates the layers of hardened lava that make up the massive feature. The block-like nature of the rock face, caused by columnar jointing, is similar to features on Earth, such as the Devil's Tower in Wyoming. Artwork done for NASA by Pat Rawlings, of SAIC.
STS-79 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS079-811-019 Yellowstone Area, Wyoming September, 1996 The Yellowstone area, one of the most geologically unique regions in the world, can be seen in this synoptic generally west-looking low-oblique view. The majority of the area is located atop a geothermal ?hotspot? in the mantle of the earth, a geologic layer just below the earth?s crust. This concentrated hotspot under the earth provides the heat necessary to drive the incredible hydrothermal features and volcanic activity. The world?s greatest concentration of geysers and hot springs are situated here in the Yellowstone area. A large caldera, which is caused by a collapsed volcano, exists in the southern portion of Yellowstone and is the remnant of a major volcanic eruption that occurred about 1.2 million years ago. Yellowstone Lake, (small and very dark blue) just to the right and slightly above the center of the image, is the largest high mountain lake in North America and fills part of the huge caldera. Other features visible in this view include the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole (to the left of Yellowstone Lake); the Absaroka Range (to the east or right of Yellowstone Lake); and the Wind River Range (extending southeastward or below the Grand Tetons and Jackson Hole). The Bighorn Mountains of north central Wyoming are discernible in the lower right portion of the image. Between the Bighorn Mountains and the Yellowstone area is the Bighorn Basin. Near the bottom center of the image is the Great Divide Basin. In the bottom left portion of the image are the Uinta Mountains of northern Utah. Bear Lake and the northern Wasatch Range are visible near the left center of the image. Just to the west of the Wasatch Range, the northern portion of the Great Salt Lake is discernible. Extending westward from the Yellowstone area toward the upper left of the image is the Snake River Plain of eastern Idaho.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS112-708-002 (7-18 October 2002) --- This image, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis, covers parts of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Idaho. The Front Range of the Rockies is the dark range crossing the bottom of the view, with Denver and neighboring cities (grays) situated in the gentle embayment of the mountains (bottom center of the view). Great Salt Lake in Utah appears as two colors of blue top left, with the snow-covered Uinta Mountains just below, in this northwesterly view. Most of the view encompasses the brown plains of western Wyoming (center) and the cluster of mountains around Yellowstone (top center, top right, with snow). Beyond the brown Snake River Plain, black rocks of the Sawtooth Mountains and neighboring ranges of central Idaho appear top center.
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