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Browse All : Images by Dr. Hugh L. Dryden

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Eisenhower, Glennan, and Dryden
Eisenhower, Glennan, an...
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10.01.1958
 
Hugh Dryden Touring Aeronautical Research Facilities in Germany
Hugh Dryden Touring Aer...
NASA Management
05/19/1945
Johns Hopkins Universit...
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden
NASA-Deputy-Administrat...
UNKNOWN
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Dr. Hugh Dryden Swearing in Dr. George E. Mueller
Dr. Hugh Dryden Swearin...
NASA Management
09/03/1963
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
President Eisenhower Presents NASA Commissions
President Eisenhower Pr...
1959-01-01
 
As a very young undergraduate Student at Johns Hopkins University Hugh L. Dryden proved himself especially gifted in physics and mathematics and began advanced study with Professor Joseph Ames, an important figure on campus. Ames not only headed the Physics Department but also eventually became President of Johns Hopkins. More important to Dryden?s development, his professor would one day chair the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), an institution at the vanguard of aircraft research. In Dryden, Ames had discovered a star pupil, whom he called, ?the brightest young man [I] ever had, without exception.? He took his Bachelor?s degree with honors in three years and in 1918 completed a Masters thesis entitled ?Airplanes: An Introduction to the Physical Principles Embodied in their Use.? Ames had introduced Dryden to a subject that would occupy the rest of his life. Certain of Ames? encouragement and assistance, Dryden decided to work toward his doctorate. In the spring of 1919, he received the Ph.D. degree in applied physics, at 20 the youngest person ever to earn a Johns Hopkins University doctorate. His dissertation, titled ?Air Forces on Circular Cylinders,? described the scale effects of air flowing around columns perpendicular to the wind and launched him in the rising field of aerodynamics. Dryden?s scientific standing rested largely on the theoretical insights, the experiments, and the publications dating from his first six years in his position as Chief of the Aerodynamics Section at the National Bureau of Standards. Later in 1949 he became director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) and then deputy administrator of the NACA?s successor, NASA, in 1958. Very much interested in flight research, he had been responsible for establishing a permanent facility at the location later named in his honor, the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden seat...
February 5, 1976
 
Description As a very young undergraduate Student at Johns Hopkins University Hugh L. Dryden proved himself especially gifted in physics and mathematics and began advanced study with Professor Joseph Ames, an important figure on campus. Ames not only headed the Physics Department but also eventually became President of Johns Hopkins. More important to Dryden?s development, his professor would one day chair the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), an institution at the vanguard of aircraft research. In Dryden, Ames had discovered a star pupil, whom he called, ?the brightest young man [I] ever had, without exception.? He took his Bachelor?s degree with honors in three years and in 1918 completed a Masters thesis entitled ?Airplanes: An Introduction to the Physical Principles Embodied in their Use.? Ames had introduced Dryden to a subject that would occupy the rest of his life. Certain of Ames? encouragement and assistance, Dryden decided to work toward his doctorate. In the spring of 1919, he received the Ph.D. degree in applied physics, at 20 the youngest person ever to earn a Johns Hopkins University doctorate. His dissertation, titled ?Air Forces on Circular Cylinders,? described the scale effects of air flowing around columns perpendicular to the wind and launched him in the rising field of aerodynamics. Dryden?s scientific standing rested largely on the theoretical insights, the experiments, and the publications dating from his first six years in his position as Chief of the Aerodynamics Section at the National Bureau of Standards. Later in 1949 he became director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) and then deputy administrator of the NACA?s successor, NASA, in 1958. Very much interested in flight research, he had been responsible for establishing a permanent facility at the location later named in his honor, the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California.
Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden, had many titles after his name in his lifetime. In 1949 he became the director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Dr. Dryden received many accolades and awards both during his life and after his death, but the greatest and most appropriate honor came on March 26, 1976, when NASA renamed the NASA Flight Research Center as the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. At the dedication ceremony NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher stated: "in 1924, when the fastest racing planes did well to fly at 280 m.p.h., Dryden was already probing the transonic range of . . . flight. Later in the 1920s, he sought to develop methods of accurately measuring . . . turbulence in wind tunnels. In 1938 he was the first American to deliver the Wright Brothers lecture. His 'Turbulence and the Boundary Layer' became a classic summary on the subject. It is most fitting that this Flight Research Center, with its unique and highly specialized capability for solving aerospace problems, should memorialize the genius of Hugh Dryden." Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the NACA (a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA?s director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - po...
October 20, 1958
 
Description Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden, had many titles after his name in his lifetime. In 1949 he became the director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Dr. Dryden received many accolades and awards both during his life and after his death, but the greatest and most appropriate honor came on March 26, 1976, when NASA renamed the NASA Flight Research Center as the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. At the dedication ceremony NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher stated: "in 1924, when the fastest racing planes did well to fly at 280 m.p.h., Dryden was already probing the transonic range of . . . flight. Later in the 1920s, he sought to develop methods of accurately measuring . . . turbulence in wind tunnels. In 1938 he was the first American to deliver the Wright Brothers lecture. His 'Turbulence and the Boundary Layer' became a classic summary on the subject. It is most fitting that this Flight Research Center, with its unique and highly specialized capability for solving aerospace problems, should memorialize the genius of Hugh Dryden." Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the NACA (a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA?s director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.
U-2 with fictitious NASA markings to support CIA cover story for pilot Gary Powers, shot down over S
U-2 with fictitious NAS...
After Francis Gary Powe...
05.06.1960
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Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - portrait
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - po...
Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden...
01.01.1959
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Dr. Hugh L. Dryden seated at desk
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden seat...
As a very young undergr...
01.01.1976
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