REFINE 

Browse All : Images by Frank Culbertson

51-69 of 69
1 2
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a 24-hour delay of the STS-105 launch, Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson steps off the Astrovan that has returned the crews to the Operations and Checkout Building. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:15 p.m. The launch window extends for Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. These were clear violations of launch weather criteria. The next launch attempt will be on Friday, Aug. 10, at the preferred launch time of about 5:15 p.m. The launch window extends for about 5 minutes. On the mission, Space Shuttle Discovery will be transporting the Expedition Three crew and several scientific experiments and payloads to the International Space Station, including the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank. The EAS, which will support the thermal control subsystems until a permanent system is activated, will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition Three crew members cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov (left) and Commander Frank Culbertson (right) walk to their T-38 jets for their morning training flights. The Expedition Three and STS-105 crews are preparing for launch on Aug. 9. On mission STS-105, Discovery will be transporting the Expedition Three crew and several payloads and scientific experiments to the Space Station. The Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which contains spare ammonia for the Station?s cooling system and will support the thermal control subsystems until a permanent system is activated, will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- During pre-launch preparations, Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson shows his eagerness for liftoff. On the mission, Discovery will be transporting the Expedition Three crew and several scientific experiments and payloads to the ISS, including the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank. The EAS, which will support the thermal control subsystems until a permanent system is activated, will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station. Launch is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson is helped with his launch and entry suit for the second launch attempt after a 24-hour weather delay. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station?s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station?s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson sends a greeting home while having his flight equipment checked before he enters Space Shuttle Discovery for launch. Helping him are (front) USA Mechanical Technician Al Schmidt and (back) NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Ken Strite. The payload on the STS-105 mission to the International Space Station includes the third flight of the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank. The EAS, which will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks, contains spare ammonia for the Station?s cooling system. Also, the Expedition Three crew is aboard to replace the Expedition Two crew on the International Space Station, who will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Endeavour slows to a stop on Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility as its drag chute slowly falls to the ground. Completing mission STS-108, Endeavour's main gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:10 p.m. EST (17:55:10 GMT); nose gear touchdown at 12:55:23 p.m. (17:55:23 GMT); wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. (17:56:13 GMT). Rollout distance was 8,941 feet. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the International Space Station. The landing is the 57th at KSC in the history of the program STS-108 was the 12th mission to the Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With its drag chute billowing behind, orbiter Endeavour slows for a full touchdown on Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-108. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the International Space Station. After a mission-elapsed time of 11 days, 19 hours and 35 minutes, Endeavour had main gear touchdown at 12:55:10 p.m. EST (17:55:10 GMT). Nose gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:23 p.m. (17:55:23 GMT); wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. (17:56:13 GMT). Rollout distance was 8,941 feet. The landing is the 57th at KSC in the history of the program STS-108 was the 12th mission to the Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour raises dust as it glides to a smooth landing on Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-108. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the International Space Station. After a mission-elapsed time of 11 days, 19 hours and 35 minutes, Endeavour had main gear touchdown at 12:55:10 p.m. EST (17:55:10 GMT). Nose gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:23 p.m. (17:55:23 GMT); wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. (17:56:13 GMT). Rollout distance was 8,941 feet. The landing is the 57th at KSC in the history of the program STS-108 was the 12th mission to the Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Frank Culbertson stands next to the cherry laurel tree he has dedicated and helped plant near KSC Headquarters Building. The tree commemorates his stay on and safe return from the International Space Station as a member of the Expedition 3 crew. Culbertson served as commander for the four-month stay, August to December 2001. The tree planting is a tradition for the Expedition crews.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Frank Culbertson (with sunglasses) gets help moving a tree into its freshly dug hole near KSC Headquarters Building. The tree commemorates his stay on and safe return from the International Space Station as a member of the Expedition 3 crew. Culbertson served as commander for the four-month stay, August to December 2001. The tree planting is a tradition for the Expedition crews.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Frank Culbertson digs into the pile of dirt to plant the cherry laurel tree (right) near KSC Headquarters Building. The tree commemorates his stay on and safe return from the International Space Station as a member of the Expedition 3 crew. Culbertson served as commander for the four-month stay, August to December 2001. The tree planting is a tradition for the Expedition crews.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Frank Culbertson (left) autographs photos for KSC employees following his presentation on his experiences as commander of Expedition 3 aboard the International Space Station. Culbertson began his stay on ISS in August 2001 and returned Dec. 17 aboard Endeavour after mission STS-108.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (at microphone) presents an American flag, a special wrench, and an optical disc to NASA Administrator Dan Goldin following Discovery's landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, as Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. This landing not only concluded the STS-91 mission, but Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program as well. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program, the wrench was used on Mir and will be used on the International Space Station, and the optical disc holds data recorded on Mir. All of these items were brought back to Earth from Mir by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space
STS-91 Mission Commande...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
NASA Administrator Dan Goldin congratulates Phase I Shuttle/Mir Program Manager Frank Culbertson on the successful conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility following Discovery's landing, as Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (applauding) and the other members of the STS-91 flight crew look on. Culbertson is holding an American flag, a special wrench, and an optical disc, which he had just been presented by Goldin. The flag rode aboard Mir from the beginning of the Phase I program, the wrench was used on Mir and will be used on the International Space Station, and the optical disc holds data recorded on Mir. All of these items were brought back to Earth from Mir by the STS-91 crew. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. Besides Commander Precourt, the STS-91 flight crew also included Pilot Dominic L. Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space
NASA Administrator Dan ...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-108 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
01PD1831 (17 December 2001) --- Orbiter Endeavour drops through scattered clouds to land on Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-108. After a mission-elapsed time of 11 days, 19 hours and 35 minutes, the landing is the 57th at KSC in the history of the program. Main gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:10 p.m. EST (17:55:10 GMT), nose gear touchdown at 12:55:23 p.m. (17:55:23 GMT) , wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. (17:56:13 GMT). STS-108 was the 12th mission to the International Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the Space Station.
STS-108 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
01PD1829 (17 December 2001) --- Orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-108. After a mission-elapsed time of 11 days, 19 hours and 35 minutes, the landing is the 57th at KSC in the history of the program. Main gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:10 p.m. EST (17:55:10 GMT), nose gear touchdown at 12:55:23 p.m. (17:55:23 GMT) , wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. (17:56:13 GMT). STS-108 was the 12th mission to the International Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the Space Station.
STS-108 Shuttle Mission...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
01PD1826 (17 December 2001) --- After dropping through cloud cover, Orbiter Endeavour approaches Runway 15 at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, with a mission elapsed time of 11 days, 19 hours, 35 minutes. Main gear touchdown occurred at 12:55:10 p.m. EST, nose gear touchdown at 12:55:23 p.m. , wheel stop at 12:56:13 p.m. The landing, the 57th at KSC in the history of the program completed the STS-108 mission known as Utilization Flight 1, which was the 12th mission to the International Space Station. This mission was the 107th flight in the Shuttle program and the 17th flight for the orbiter. Endeavour carries both the mission crew and the Expedition 3 crew - Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonauts Vladimir Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin - who are returning to Earth after 129 days in space on the Space Station.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
September 11, 2001 --- This still image, taken from video sent from the International Space Station on Tuesday, shows a smoke plume rising from the Manhattan area of New York City. This view was taken by Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson as the space station flew over New York at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. (This image has not yet been catalogued.)
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description
September 11, 2001 --- This still image, taken from video sent from the International Space Station on Tuesday, shows a smoke plume rising from the Manhattan area of New York City. This view was taken by Expedition Three Commander Frank Culbertson as the space station flew over New York at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. (This image has not yet been catalogued.)
51-69 of 69
1 2