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Browse All : Images by Fred Haise

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Lunar Lander Exhibit
Lunar Lander Exhibit
Lunar Lander Exhibit at...
9/25/00
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 2000
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise and Apollo 13 Mission Patch
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fre...
Fred Haise, Apollo 13, ...
4/17/00
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 2000
Apollo XIII Astronaut Fred Haise Visits Stennis
Apollo XIII Astronaut F...
Apollo, Fred Haise, ast...
1/1/95
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 1995
Leaders break ground for INFINITY
Leaders break ground fo...
INFINITY, Gottfried, Jo...
11/20/08
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 2008
Apollo 13 Crew at Press Conference
Apollo 13 Crew at Press...
1970-01-01
 
Apollo 13 Crew Returns Home
Apollo 13 Crew Returns ...
1970-04-17
 
Fred W. Haise Jr. was a research pilot and an astronaut for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1959 to 1979. He began flying at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio (today the Glenn Research Center), in 1959. He became a research pilot at the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC), Edwards, Calif., in 1963, serving NASA in that position for three years until being selected to be an astronaut in 1966 His best-known assignment at the FRC (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) was as a lifting body pilot. Shortly after flying the M2-F1 on a car tow to about 25 feet on April 22, 1966, he was assigned as an astronaut to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. While at the FRC he had also flown a variety of other research and support aircraft, including the variable-stability T-33A to simulate the M2-F2 heavyweight lifting body, some light aircraft including the Piper PA-30 to evaluate their handling qualities, the Apache helicopter, the Aero Commander, the Cessna 310, the Douglas F5D, the Lockheed F-104 and T-33, the Cessna T-37, and the Douglas C-47. After becoming an astronaut, Haise served as a backup crewmember for the Apollo 8, 11, and 16 missions. He flew on the aborted Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970, spending 142 hours and 54 minutes in space before returning safely to Earth. In 1977, he was the commander of three free flights of the Space Shuttle prototype Enterprise when it flew its Approach and Landing Tests at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Meanwhile, from April 1973 to January 1976, Haise served as the Technical Assistant to the Manager of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Project. In 1979, he left NASA to become the Vice President for Space Programs with the Grumman Aerospace Corporation. He then served as President of Grumman Technical Services, an operating division of Northrop Grumman Corporation, from January 1992 until his retirement. Haise was born in Biloxi, Miss., on November 14, 1933. He underwent flight training with the U.S. Navy, completing that in 1954 and becoming a fighter pilot in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1954 to 1956. He also served as a tactical fighter pilot with the U.S. Air Force from October 1961 to August 1962. Meanwhile, he graduated with a bachelor of science in aeronautical engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1959. Later, he graduated from the U. S. Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in 1964 as its outstanding graduate. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA and Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Among his awards are the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Haley Astronautics Award, the General Thomas D. White Space Trophy, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the NASA Special Achievement Award.
Research pilot Fred Hai...
April 7, 1966
 
Description Fred W. Haise Jr. was a research pilot and an astronaut for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1959 to 1979. He began flying at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio (today the Glenn Research Center), in 1959. He became a research pilot at the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC), Edwards, Calif., in 1963, serving NASA in that position for three years until being selected to be an astronaut in 1966 His best-known assignment at the FRC (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center) was as a lifting body pilot. Shortly after flying the M2-F1 on a car tow to about 25 feet on April 22, 1966, he was assigned as an astronaut to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. While at the FRC he had also flown a variety of other research and support aircraft, including the variable-stability T-33A to simulate the M2-F2 heavyweight lifting body, some light aircraft including the Piper PA-30 to evaluate their handling qualities, the Apache helicopter, the Aero Commander, the Cessna 310, the Douglas F5D, the Lockheed F-104 and T-33, the Cessna T-37, and the Douglas C-47. After becoming an astronaut, Haise served as a backup crewmember for the Apollo 8, 11, and 16 missions. He flew on the aborted Apollo 13 lunar mission in 1970, spending 142 hours and 54 minutes in space before returning safely to Earth. In 1977, he was the commander of three free flights of the Space Shuttle prototype Enterprise when it flew its Approach and Landing Tests at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Meanwhile, from April 1973 to January 1976, Haise served as the Technical Assistant to the Manager of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Project. In 1979, he left NASA to become the Vice President for Space Programs with the Grumman Aerospace Corporation. He then served as President of Grumman Technical Services, an operating division of Northrop Grumman Corporation, from January 1992 until his retirement. Haise was born in Biloxi, Miss., on November 14, 1933. He underwent flight training with the U.S. Navy, completing that in 1954 and becoming a fighter pilot in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1954 to 1956. He also served as a tactical fighter pilot with the U.S. Air Force from October 1961 to August 1962. Meanwhile, he graduated with a bachelor of science in aeronautical engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 1959. Later, he graduated from the U. S. Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base in 1964 as its outstanding graduate. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA and Fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Among his awards are the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Haley Astronautics Award, the General Thomas D. White Space Trophy, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the NASA Special Achievement Award.
Research pilot and form...
Research pilot and form...
04/30/2005
 
M2-F1 in flight over la...
Following the first M2-...
August 30, 1963
 
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise during water egress training
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fre...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Astronaut Fred Haise simulates lunar surface EVA during training exercise
Astronaut Fred Haise si...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise during lunar surface simulation training
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fre...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise during lunar surface simulation training
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fre...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Artist's concept of Apollo 13 astronauts exploring lunar surface
Artist's concept of Apo...
An artist's concept by ...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Astronaut Fred Haise participates in simulation training
Astronaut Fred Haise pa...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Astronaut Fred Haise in suiting room prior to launch
Astronaut Fred Haise in...
A space suit technician...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Apollo 13 crew recovery after splashdown
Apollo 13 crew recovery...
Astronaut John L. Swige...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown
View of Mission Control...
Overall view of Mission...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown
View of Mission Control...
Overall view of Mission...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Astronaut Fred Haise first commander for Shuttle Approach and Landing Test
Astronaut Fred Haise fi...
Astronaut Fred W. Haise...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
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Dale Reed with model in front of M2-F1
Dale Reed with model in...
Dale Reed with a model ...
03.06.1967
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M2-F1 on lakebed with pilots Milt Thompson, Chuck Yeager, Don Mallick, and Bruce Peterson
M2-F1 on lakebed with p...
After the initial M2-F1...
11.12.1963
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M2-F1 in flight over lakebed on tow line
M2-F1 in flight over la...
Following the first M2-...
01.01.1963
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Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise and Apollo 13 Mission Patch
Apollo 13 Astronaut Fre...
Astronaut Fred Haise Jr...
04.17.2000
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Apollo XIII Astronaut Fred Haise Visits Stennis
Apollo XIII Astronaut F...
South Mississippi nativ...
01.01.1995
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Lunar Lander Exhibit
Lunar Lander Exhibit
NASA's Lunar Lander exh...
09.25.2000
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, new inductee Gordon Fullerton (left) is congratulated by Chairman Owen Garriott. At right is Hall of Famer Fred Haise. Other Hall of Famers are gathered on stage for the ceremony, which is being held in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex?s Apollo/Saturn V Center. Recognized for their individual flight accomplishments and contributions to the success and future success of the U.S. space program, this elite group of inductees is among only 60 astronauts to be honored in the Hall of Fame and the fourth group of Space Shuttle astronauts named.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the Astronaut Hall of Fame are applauded by the guests at the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony held at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex?s Apollo/Saturn V Center. From left are Al Gordon, John Young, Walt Cunningham, Bill Anders, Owen Garriott, Ed Mitchell, Gordon Fullerton, Al Worden, Charlie Duke, Joe Allen, Jack Lousma, Bruce McCandless, Bill Pogue, Robert Crippen, Jim Lovell, Dan Brandenstein, Robert ?Hoot? Gibson, Fred Haise, and Stephen Covey. Not pictured are Scott Carpenter and Vance Brand. McCandless, Allen and Fullerton are the 2005 inductees. Recognized for their individual flight accomplishments and contributions to the success and future success of the U.S. space program, this elite group of inductees is among only 60 astronauts to be honored in the Hall of Fame and the fourth group of Space Shuttle astronauts named.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, new inductee Bruce McCandless speaks to the guests. Seen behind him are current Hall of Famers (back row) Al Gordon, Walt Cunningham, Jack Lousma, Bill Pogue, Robert Crippen, Dan Brandenstein and Robert ?Hoot? Gibson; (front row) Scott Carpenter, John Young, Owen Garriott, Jim Lovell, Fred Haise and Vance Brand. Garriott is chairman of the Astronaut Hall of Fame. The other new inductees are Joe Allen and Gordon Fullerton. The event is being held in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex?s Apollo/Saturn V Center. Recognized for their individual flight accomplishments and contributions to the success and future success of the U.S. space program, this elite group of inductees is among only 60 astronauts to be honored in the Hall of Fame and the fourth group of Space Shuttle astronauts named.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astronaut Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, Chairman Owen Garriott (center) places a medal around the neck of new inductee Gordon Fullerton. At right is Hall of Famer Fred Haise. Other Hall of Famers are gathered on stage for the ceremony, which is being held in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex?s Apollo/Saturn V Center. Recognized for their individual flight accomplishments and contributions to the success and future success of the U.S. space program, this elite group of inductees is among only 60 astronauts to be honored in the Hall of Fame and the fourth group of Space Shuttle astronauts named.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
C-75-3012 - SHUTTLE IN 10X10 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL SWT PHOTO WITH FRED HAISE AUTOGRAPH
C-75-3012 - SHUTTLE IN ...
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