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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-117 crew members arrive at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft to prepare for launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis on June 8. Commander Frederick Sturckow is greeted by Janet Petro, deputy director of Kennedy. Astronaut Jerry Ross, chief of the Vehicle Integration Test Office at Johnson Space Center, looks on. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install a 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy a set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-117 crew members arrive at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft to prepare for launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis on June 8. Mission Specialist Steven Swanson is greeted by Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach. Behind Swanson, at left, is Commander Frederick Sturckow; Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester is at center; Janet Petro, deputy director of Kennedy, is at right. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install a 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy a set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Back at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-117 Pilot Lee Archambault and Commander Frederick Sturckow are satisfied with their landing practice in the shuttle training aircraft (STA) behind them. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow and Pilot Lee Archambault aim high to begin landing practice in the shuttle training aircraft (STA). The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The shuttle training aircraft, or STA, with STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow and Pilot Lee Archambault in the cockpit begins to taxi to the runway at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Sturckow and Archambault will be making practice landings in the STA, which is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- It's wheels up for the shuttle training aircraft, or STA, after takeoff from KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility with STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow and Pilot Lee Archambault in the cockpit. Sturckow and Archambault will be making practice landings in the STA, which is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow climbs into the shuttle training aircraft, or STA, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He will be making practice landings in the STA, which is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, the crew members of mission STS-117 are suiting up for a launch attempt at 7:38 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Pictured here is Commander Frederick Sturckow, who is making his third shuttle flight. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the International Space Station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Back at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow (left) and Pilot Lee Archambault are satisfied with their landing practice in the shuttle training aircraft (STA) behind them. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow (left) and Pilot Lee Archambault head for the shuttle training aircraft, or STA, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. They will be making practice landings in the STA, which is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow settles into his seat in the shuttle training aircraft, or STA, at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He will be making practice landings in the STA, which is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter's cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter's atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. STS-117 is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. June 8. During the 11-day mission and three spacewalks, the crew will work with flight controllers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to install the 17-ton segment on the station's girder-like truss and deploy the set of solar arrays, S3/S4. The mission will increase the space station's power capability in preparation for the arrival of new science modules from the European and Japanese space agencies. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, the crew members of mission STS-117 are suiting up for a launch attempt at 7:38 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Pictured here after donning his helmet is Commander Frederick Sturckow, who is making his third shuttle flight. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the International Space Station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow is helped by the closeout crew in the White Room on Launch Pad 39A to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT. Members of the Closeout Crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight
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