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STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow (right) operates an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training under the watchful eye of instructor George Hoggard during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut
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STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman (left) suits up in the Operations and Checkout Building, as part of flight crew equipment fit check, prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39A. He is helped by suit tech Terri McKinney. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. This is Newman's third space flight. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
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The STS-88 crew members pose for a group photograph in front of a T-38 jet aircraft after their nighttime arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left to right, they are Mission Specialist Sergei Krikalev, who is a Russian cosmonaut, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie, Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
The STS-88 crew members...
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The STS-88 crew receives instruction on the operation of an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training from George Hoggard (back to camera) during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left to right, they are Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross; Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut; Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie; Mission Specialist James H. Newman; and Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
The STS-88 crew receive...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross prepares to operate an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training under the watchful eye of instructor George Hoggard (left) during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow; and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At launch pad 39A, the STS-88 crew pose for a photograph after Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, they are Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut; Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow; Mission Specialist James H. Newman; Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross; and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
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STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman (right) receives instruction on the operation of an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training from George Hoggard during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow; and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross arrives after dark at the Shuttle Landing Facility to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie and James H. Newman and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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After suiting up for their practice countdown exercise, STS-88 crew members head for the bus outside the Operations and Checkout Building for the trip to Launch Pad 39A. From left they are Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist Sergei Krikalev, who is a Russian cosmonaut, Mission Specialists James H. Newman and Nancy J. Currie, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
After suiting up for th...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman gives a thumbs up on his nighttime arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev (left) and James H. Newman (right) are ready to leave Launch Pad 39A in the slidewire basket during an emergency egress exercise. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Unity will be mated with the already orbiting Russian-built Zarya control module. The 12-day mission includes three planned spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-88 crew get instruction from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA), on emergency egress procedures from launch pad 39A. From left, they are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
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STS-88 Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, operates an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training under the watchful eye of instructor George Hoggard (left) during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow; and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, and James H. Newman
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev and James H. Newman practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket at Launch Pad 39A as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, a dress rehearsal for launch. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-88 Mission Specialists James H. Newman (left) and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev (right) hurry toward the slidewire basket at the 195-foot level of Launch Pad 39A during an emergency egress exercise. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Unity will be mated with the already orbiting Russian-built Zarya control module. The 12-day mission includes three planned spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Pad 39A, the STS-88 crew pose after successfully completing a pre-launch countdown exercise as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. From left, they are Mission Specialist James H. Newman, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Ph.D., Jerry L. Ross and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Unity will be mated with the already orbiting Russian-built Zarya control module. The 12-day mission includes three planned spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev (left) and James H. Newman (right) are ready to leave Launch Pad 39A in the slidewire basket during an emergency egress exercise. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Unity will be mated with the already orbiting Russian-built Zarya control module. The 12-day mission includes three planned spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
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Introduced by NASA News Chief Bruce Buckingham (left), the STS-88 crew answer questions from media representatives after a day of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, they are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
Introduced by NASA News...
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(From left) STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman examine some equipment that will be used on their upcoming space flight. The astronauts are in the Operations and Checkout Building as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station. The Space Shuttle Endeavour will carry the six-member crew and the Unity connecting module with its two attached pressurized mating adapters
(From left) STS-88 Pilo...
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STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev (left) and James H. Newman (right) sit inside orbiter Endeavour during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Activities (TCDT). The TCDT includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and the simulated main engine cut-off exercise. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Unity will be mated with the already orbiting Russian-built Zarya control module. The 12-day mission includes three planned spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev poses for a photograph in the white room on Launch Pad 39A while taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. This will be Krikalev's second space flight. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, and James H. Newman. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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At Launch Pad 39A, STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow (at left) and Commander Robert D. Cabana look over the Unity connecting module and its two attached pressurized mating adapters. Unity is in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, awaiting liftoff of Mission STS-88. Cabana, Sturckow and the other four members of the STS-88 crew arrived at KSC in the early morning hours of Nov. 30 for prelaunch preparations. The other crew members are Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The scheduled liftoff is at 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. Unity is the primary payload of the mission, which is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. The crew will be mating Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
At Launch Pad 39A, STS-...
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At Launch Pad 39A, STS-88 Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana gets a close look at the Unity connecting module and its two attached pressurized mating adapters. Unity is in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, awaiting liftoff of Mission STS-88. Cabana and the other five members of the STS-88 crew arrived at KSC in the early morning hours of Nov. 30 for final prelaunch preparations. The other crew members are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The scheduled liftoff is at 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. Unity is the primary payload of the mission, which is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. The crew will be mating Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
At Launch Pad 39A, STS-...
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STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow (at left) and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie walk across the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility after exiting the T-38 jet aircraft (in background) that brought them to KSC. They join the four other crew members, Commander Robert D. Cabana and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, for prelaunch preparations for mission STS-88 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
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A smiling STS-88 Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross prepares to exit the T-38 jet aircraft that brought him to the Shuttle Landing Facility. He joins the five other crew members, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, for prelaunch preparations for mission STS-88 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
A smiling STS-88 Missio...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, smiles at onlookers after his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins the five other crew members, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman, for prelaunch preparations for Mission STS-88 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana smiles at onlookers after his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, for prelaunch preparations for Mission STS-88 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
STS-88 Commander Robert...
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The STS-88 crew leave the Operations and Checkout Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A. In the front row (left to right) are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie and Commander Robert D. Cabana. Behind them (left to right) are Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, with landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14
The STS-88 crew leave t...
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Shortly after their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-88 crew members talk to the media. From left, they are Mission Specialists James H. Newman and Jerry L. Ross, Commander Robert D. Cabana (at microphone), Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, and Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow. Krikalev is a Russian cosmonaut who has flown three times in space, once on the Space Shuttle and twice aboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The STS-88 mission is the fourth spaceflight for Cabana, sixth for Ross, third for Currie, third for Newman and first for Sturckow. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, Endeavour will carry two small replacement electronics boxes for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 12 days
Shortly after their arr...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window.The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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STS-88 crew members depart the Operations and Checkout Building to board the astronaut van (at right) for the short journey to Launch Pad 39A where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is poised for liftoff of the first U.S. launch dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. In front row, from left, are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie and Commander Robert D. Cabana. In back row, from left, are Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut; Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. Liftoff is targeted for 3:35 a.m. EST on Dec. 4
STS-88 crew members dep...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A bird (at upper right) soars near the Space Shuttle Endeavour as the vehicle lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour blazes through the night sky as it begins the first U.S. mission, STS-88, dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman takes part in a complete suit check before launch. Newman holds a toy dog, "Pluto," representing the crew nickname Dog Crew 3 and Newman's nickname, Pluto. Mission STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14
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STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman gets assistance from suit technician Terri McKinney while donning his orange launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-88 will be Newman?s third spaceflight. He also is scheduled to perform three spacewalks on the mission. He and the five other STS-88 crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is poised for liftoff on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station
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The STS-88 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left to right are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. Mission STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already on orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14
The STS-88 crew gather ...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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As part of the final STS-88 prelaunch activities, the six crew members gather for a last meal before liftoff and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left, they are Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut; Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow; Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie; Commander Robert D. Cabana; and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. STS-88 will be the first U.S. launch dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Center. Liftoff aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour is targeted for 3:36 a.m. EST, Dec. 4, from Launch Pad 39A
As part of the final ST...
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STS-88 Mission Specialist James H. Newman is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39A before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Newman is making his third spaceflight and is one of two extravehicular activity crew members on this mission
STS-88 Mission Speciali...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission, STS-88, dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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After leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-88 crew approach the Astrovan for their trip to Launch Pad 39A. In the back row are (left to right) Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. In the front row (left to right) are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie and Commander Robert D. Cabana. STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, with landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14
After leaving the Opera...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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Wearing their orange launch and entry suits, STS-88 crew members leave the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is poised for liftoff of the first U.S. launch dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. In front row, from left, are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie and Commander Robert D. Cabana. In back row, from left, are Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut; Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. Liftoff is targeted for 3:35 a.m. EST on Dec. 4
Wearing their orange la...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle Endeavour illuminates the night sky as it embarks on the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station. Liftoff on Dec. 4 from Launch Pad 39A was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- As the Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on Mission STS-88, several fish believed to be mullet (at center left) "launch" themselves out of the water from one of the waterways around the pad. Liftoff of the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST on Dec. 4. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a flawless mission, Endeavour prepares to land on Runway 15 at the Shuttle Landing Facility to complete an 11-day, 19-hour and 18-minute-long STS-88 mission. At the controls is Commander Robert D. Cabana.. Other crew members on board are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This is the tenth nighttime landing for a Space Shuttle, the fifth at Kennedy Space Center, and the ninth landing of Endeavour at KSC. On the 4.6-million-mile mission, Endeavour carried the U.S.-built Unity connecting module to begin construction of the International Space Station. The crew successfully mated Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module during three space walks. With this mission, Ross completed seven space walks totaling 44 hours and 9 minutes, more than any other American space walker. Newman moved into third place for U.S. space walks with a total of 28 hours and 27 minutes on four excursions
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a flawless mission, Endeavour prepares to touch down on Runway 15 at the Shuttle Landing Facility to complete an 11-day, 19-hour and 18-minute-long STS-88 mission. At the controls is Commander Robert D. Cabana. Other crew members on board are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This is the tenth nighttime landing for a Space Shuttle, the fifth at Kennedy Space Center, and the ninth landing of Endeavour at KSC. On the 4.6-million-mile mission, Endeavour carried the U.S.-built Unity connecting module to begin construction of the International Space Station. The crew successfully mated Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module during three space walks. With this mission, Ross completed seven space walks totaling 44 hours and 9 minutes, more than any other American space walker. Newman moved into third place for U.S. space walks with a total of 28 hours and 27 minutes on four excursions
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After an end-of-mission landing on Runway 15 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard orbiter Endeavour at 10:53:29 p.m. EST, STS-88 Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie (left) and Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow (right) walk under the orbiter to greet well-wishers. Also on board were Commander Robert D. Cabana and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. On the 4.6-million-mile, nearly 12-day flawless mission, Endeavour carried the U.S.-built Unity connecting module to begin construction of the International Space Station. The crew successfully mated Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module during three space walks. With this mission, Ross completed seven space walks totaling 44 hours and 9 minutes, more than any other American space walker. Newman moved into third place for U.S. space walks with a total of 28 hours and 27 minutes on four excursions
After an end-of-mission...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a flawless mission, Endeavour touches down at 10:53:29 p.m. EST on Runway 15 at the Shuttle Landing Facility to complete an 11-day, 19-hour and 18-minute-long STS-88 mission. At the controls is Commander Robert D. Cabana. Other crew members on board are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This is the tenth nighttime landing for a Space Shuttle, the fifth at Kennedy Space Center, and the ninth landing of Endeavour at KSC. On the 4.6-million-mile mission, Endeavour carried the U.S.-built Unity connecting module to begin construction of the International Space Station. The crew successfully mated Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module during three space walks. With this mission, Ross completed seven space walks totaling 44 hours and 9 minutes, more than any other American space walker. Newman moved into third place for U.S. space walks with a total of 28 hours and 27 minutes on four excursions
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