REFINE 

Browse All : Images by Koichi Wakata

1-50 of 90
1 2  
Space Station Photo Op
Space Station Photo Op
3/26/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Ready to Rehearse
Ready to Rehearse
1/19/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
1992 ASCAN wilderness survival training school view
1992 ASCAN wilderness s...
Astronaut candidates Ch...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
Astronaut candidate Koichi Wakata gathers his parachute following a simulated chute drop at Vance Air Force Base.
Astronaut candidate Koi...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
Astronaut candidate Koichi Wakata gets assistance with his parachute following a simulated chute drop at Vance Air Force Base.
Astronaut candidate Koi...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
Astronaut candidate Koichi Wakata prepares to jump off a box during a parachute landing demonstration at Vance Air Force Base.
Astronaut candidate Koi...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
Astronaut candidate Koichi Wakata (left) prepares to jump off a box during a parachute landing demonstration at Vance Air Force Base.
Astronaut candidate Koi...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
Several 1992 astronaut candidates brush the sand and gravel off one another following one of several phases of parachute familiarization and survival training at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma.
Several 1992 astronaut ...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-14 0:0:0
Image
 
Several 1992 astronaut candidates wait in line to receive gear for one of several phases of parachute familiarization and survival training at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma.
Several 1992 astronaut ...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
From poolside, astronaut candidates Jean-Francois Clervoy (left) and Koichi Wakata watch as an instructor (out of view) conducts a demonstration during a water survival training course at the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida.
From poolside, astronau...
1992 ASCAN TRAINING ---...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
Astronauts Koichi Wakata (left) and Daniel T. Barry check the settings on a 35mm camera during an STS-72 training session.
Astronauts Koichi Wakat...
STS-72 TRAINING VIEW --...
2007-11-15 0:0:0
Image
 
1992 ASCAN wilderness survival training school view
1992 ASCAN wilderness s...
Astronaut candidates Ch...
08.16.1992
Image
 
Getting ready to take his turn at the wheel of the M-113 is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan. Behind him can be seen Mission Specialists Bill McArthur (left) and Leroy Chiao (right), who wait their turns. Learning to drive the armored vehicle is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter?s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
Getting ready to take h...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata and Michael Lopez-Alegria pause on the tarmac after their arrival aboard the T-38 jet aircraft in the background. They and the rest of the crew are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT includes emergency egress training from the orbiter and pad, plus a simulated countdown. The fifth mission to the International Space Station, STS-92 will carry the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, the first of the planned 10 trusses on the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z1 will allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for the solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 from launch Pad 39A. It will be the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
STS-92 Mission Speciali...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
During pre-pack and fit check in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan looks over the equipment he will be wearing during launch and entry, such as the helmet and gloves on the table. Wakata and the rest of the crew are at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT provides emergency egress training, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payload. This mission will be Wakata?s second Shuttle flight. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
During pre-pack and fit...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
With Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department, riding on top, Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan practices driving the M-113, part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Riding in the back (on the left) are other crew members, waiting their turn to drive. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter?s payload bay. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:30 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
With Capt. George Hogga...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
During pre-pack and fit check in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan gets an adjustment on his launch and entry suit. This mission is Wakata?s second Shuttle flight. He and the rest of the crew are at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT provides emergency egress training, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payload. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
During pre-pack and fit...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, STS-92 Mission Specialists William S. McArthur Jr. (left) and Koichi Wakata of Japan test the slidewire basket that they are in. They and other crew members are taking part in emergency egress training, one of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialists (left to right) Peter J.K. ?Jeff? Wisoff, Leroy Chiao, Koichi Wakata of Japan and William S. McArthur Jr. finish emergency egress training in the slidewire baskets behind them. The training is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan (center) gets help from United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Vinny Difranzo (left) and NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt (right) in suiting up in the White Room. Wakata and other crew members are taking part in a simulated countdown KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
STS-92 Mission Speciali...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan reaches for a lever that will release the slidewire basket he is in. Behind him is Mission Specialist William S. McArthur Jr. In another basket (in the background) are Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. ?Jeff? Wisoff and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria. They are taking part in emergency egress training, one of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-92 Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata of Japan (left) and William S. McArthur Jr. (right) get settled in their seats in Discovery for a simulated countdown. The countdown is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that he and other crew members have been performing. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan exits the Astrovan on its return to the Operations and Checkout Building. Behind him is Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao. The scheduled launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was scrubbed about 90 minutes before liftoff. The mission will be the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The launch has been rescheduled for liftoff Oct. 11 at 7:17 p.m
STS-92 Mission Speciali...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan waves while his launch and entry suit is checked during suitup for launch, scheduled for 8:05 p.m. EDT. The mission is the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. This launch is the second for Wakata. Landing is expected Oct. 21 at 3:55 p.m. EDT
STS-92 Mission Speciali...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy exits the Astrovan on its return to the Operations and Checkout Building. Behind her is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan. The scheduled launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was scrubbed about 90 minutes before liftoff. The mission will be the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The launch has been rescheduled for liftoff Oct. 11 at 7:17 p.m
STS-92 Pilot Pamela Ann...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
During suitup in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan signals thumbs up for a second launch attempt. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight.; Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT
During suitup in the Op...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan gets a final check of his launch and entry suit in the White Room before entering Discovery. The White Room is an environmentally controlled area at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm that provides entry to the orbiter as well as emergency egress if needed. The arm remains in the extended position until 7 minutes 24 seconds before launch. Wakata and the rest of the crew are making the fifth flight to the International Space Station for construction. Discovery carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. The mission includes four spacewalks for the construction activities. Discovery?s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT
STS-92 Mission Speciali...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - William Gaetjens (background), with the Vehicle Integration Test Team (VITT) directs Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata?s attention to the spars installed on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata looks at the spars installed on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (right) listens to William Gaetjens, with the Vehicle Integration Test Team (VITT), who is providing details about the spar installation (left) on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata gestures as he examines the spar installation (behind him) on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata gestures as he examines the spar installation (behind him) on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (front) listens to William Gaetjens, with the Vehicle Integration Test Team (VITT), who is providing details about the spar installation (left) on the wing of the orbiter Atlantis. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) panels are mechanically attached to the wing via the spars - a series of floating joints - to reduce loading on the panels caused by wing deflections. The aluminum and the metallic attachments are protected from exceeding temperature limits by internal insulation.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata is dressed in protective clothing before entering the Pressurized Module, or PM, behind him. Part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), the PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (top left) and technicians watch as a tray is extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (right) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata, dressed in blue protective clothing (at right), looks at the inside of the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), along with technicians. The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (left) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata looks over the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (left) releases a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, that he was working with. Part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), the PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions. The JEM/PM is in the Space Station Processing Facility.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata, dressed in protective clothing, talks with workers before entering the Pressurized Module, or PM, behind him. Part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), the PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, (left to right) astronauts Dan Tani, Leopold Eyharts, Koichi Wakata and Peggy Whitson study hardware for an upcoming shuttle flight. With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts get a look at the S6 integrated truss and solar arrays, scheduled to fly on STS-119 in 2008. On the left are Koichi Wakata, Dan Tani and Peggy Whitson. With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a bench review in the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts get a close look at hardware they will be taking into and using in orbit. Holding the hardware is Koichi Wakata, with the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency, who will join the Expedition 18 crew in 2008, flying on mission STS-126. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
No copyright protection...
NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-04221 (17 May 2000) --- Astronauts William S. McArthur, Jr. (left) and Koichi Wakata train in the Virtual Reality Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center's Systems Integration Facility.
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2000-E-27058 (27 October 2000) --- Astronaut Koichi Wakata, mission specialist, addresses crowd at Ellington Field during crew return ceremonies. Wakata represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).
RTF Shuttle Mission Ima...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-32498 (29 April 2003) --- Astronaut Koichi Wakata uses a precision air-bearing floor in the Systems Integration Facility at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to approximate some of the conditions of an in-space extravehicular activity (EVA) that might be called upon to repair damaged thermal tiles on a space shuttle. Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski looks on. Wakata represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA).
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-46318 (1 July 2003) --- Astronauts Koichi Wakata and Scott Parazynski, in one of the Johnson Space Center's cafeterias, join hundreds of NASA employees at field centers across the country in wishing astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition 7 NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer, a happy birthday. Wakata is with Japan's space agency.
RTF Shuttle Mission Ima...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2003-E-54219 (19 August 2003) --- Onboard a KC-135 aircraft, astronaut Koichi Wakata injects the cure-in-lace ablator into a damaged section of thermal tiles. The aircraft flew a series of special parabolas to afford a number of zero-g ?windows? for rehearsing extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks for repairing damaged shuttle tiles. Wakata represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA).
Behind the Scenes : TRA...
2006-06-16 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-18635 (6-17 February 2006) --- A group of international astronauts participates in training in the Absaroka Mountains of northwest Wyoming. Pictured near their base camp, from the left (kneeling), are astronauts Edward T. Lu, Koichi Wakata and Robert B. Thirsk; and (standing) Rex J. Walheim, Sunita L. Williams and Clayton C. Anderson. Thirsk is with the Canadian Space Agency and Wakata represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.
1-50 of 90
1 2