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STS-121 crew visits SSC
STS-121 crew visits SSC
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9/25/06
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Year 2006
Group photo of the 1996 ASCAN class
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-118 Commander Scott Kelly (left) and Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak look over equipment in the Space Station Processing Facility Facility during Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. The mission to the International Space Station will be delivering the third starboard truss segment, the ITS S5, which will be attached to the station, and a SPACEHAB Single Cargo Module with supplies and equipment. Launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for Nov. 13, 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -STS-118 Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak (left) and Barbara Morgan (right) are seen during Crew Equipment Interface Test activities in the Space Station Processing Facility. The mission to the International Space Station will be delivering the third starboard truss segment, the ITS S5, which will be attached to the station, and a SPACEHAB Single Cargo Module with supplies and equipment. Launch aboard Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for Nov. 13, 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-118 crew take part in training on equipment for their mission. Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan (above) looks at equipment. Below are STS-119 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega (left) and STS-118 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak. The STS-118 mission will be delivering the third starboard truss segment, the ITS S5, to the International Space Station, and a SPACEHAB Single Cargo Module with supplies and equipment. Launch date is under review.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., STS-121 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak looks at an orbital replacement unit sitting on the Integrated Cargo Carrier. She and other crew members are at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which provide hands-on experience with equipment they will use on-orbit. STS-121, the second Return to Flight mission, is targeted for launch in a lighted planning window of Sept. 9 to Sept. 25.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., STS-121 crew members look at equipment. From left are Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson. The STS-121 crew is at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which provide hands-on experience with equipment they will use on-orbit. STS-121, the second Return to Flight mission, is targeted for launch in a lighted planning window of Sept. 9 to Sept. 25.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., the STS-121 crew poses for a photo. From left are Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum. The STS-121 crew is at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which provide hands-on experience with equipment they will use on-orbit. STS-121, the second Return to Flight mission, is targeted for launch in a lighted planning window of Sept. 9 to Sept. 25.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Michael Fossum handles a working prototype of a camera that will be used on the mission. He and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-121 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak prepares for her upcoming mission inside Space Shuttle Discovery. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment to be used on-orbit. Launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled no earlier than May.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crew for mission STS-121 is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Looking at the trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station are Mission Specialists Michael Fossum (on ladder), Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson (below Fossum on floor). A CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in July. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the crew for mission STS-121 look at the trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station during the mission. Seen here are Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson and Lisa Nowak (background) and Michael Fossum (center front). The crew is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. A CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in July. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crew for mission STS-121 is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Seen here (left to right) are Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Stephanie Wilson and Lisa Nowak looking at the trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. A CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in July. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The crew for mission STS-121 is taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Standing in front of a work stand are, left to right, Mission Specialists Thomas Reiter and Lisa Nowak, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. Reiter represents the European Space Agency (ESA) and will remain on the space station working with the station crew under a contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency. He will return to Earth aboard STS-116 or a Russian Soyuz. A CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in July. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Michael Fossum looks underneath the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. He and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT).
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak photographs Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission, during a training session. She and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Michael Fossum and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). Seen here with Vehicle Integration Test officer Betsy Ahearn (center) are (from left) Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialist Piers Sellers. Other crew members not seen are Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). Seen here with Vehicle Integration Test officer Betsy Ahearn (center) are (from left) Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialist Piers Sellers. Other crew members not seen are Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Piers Sellers practices working with the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. He and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Michael Fossum -- are at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the television studio at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the STS-121 crew answers questions during a media conference. Seated from left are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. The seventh crew member, Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, did not attend. The crew is at NASA Kennedy Space Center for the crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. The launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey gets a close look at the wing leading edge of Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. He and other crew members -- Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson, Michael Fossum and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the television studio at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the STS-121 crew answers questions during a media conference. Seated from left are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. The seventh crew member, Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, did not attend. The crew is at NASA Kennedy Space Center for the crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. The launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew get a close look at the wing leading edge of Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. Seen here are Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialist Stephanie Nowak. They and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson (left) and Lisa Nowak learn from technicians the work that has been done on Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. They and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-121 crew stands for a photo in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building after a media conference. From left are Mission Specialist Piers Sellers, Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson and Lisa Nowak, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialist Michael Fossum. The remaining member of the crew, not pictured, is Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter. The crew is at NASA Kennedy Space Center for the crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. The launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak gets a close look at the wing leading edge of Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. She and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Michael Fossum and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-121 crew kneels for a photo with the vehicle crew. The crew members, recognized by the blue flight suits, are (left to right) Mission Specialists Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum, Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson. The crew is at Kennedy for the crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). Seen here are Mission Specialists Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum (back to camera). They are looking at the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly they will be installing on the International Space Station. Other crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Thomas Reiter. The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialists Michael Fossum (left above) and Piers Sellers (on ground) get a close look at the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. They and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson -- are at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Piers Sellers practices working with the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. He and other crew members -- Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Michael Fossum -- are at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew look at Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson, and Pilot Mark Kelly. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT), which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-121 Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak and Commander Steven Lindsey take a close look at the wing leading edge of Discovery, the launch vehicle for the mission. They and other crew members -- Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Michael Fossum and Piers Sellers -- are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with equipment they will use on orbit. Launch of STS-121, the second return-to-flight mission, is scheduled for no earlier than May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kicking up dust as its wheels touch down, the orbiter Discovery lands on Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members aboard are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Under gray skies blanketing the Central Florida skies, the orbiter Discovery kicks up dust as it touches down on Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members aboard are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Discovery, with Commander Steven Lindsey at the helm, approaches Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility for landing after completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The rest of the crew aboard are Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of Nikon/Scott Andrews
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - (From left) Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach, Associate Administrator for Space Operations Bill Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator Rex Geveden and NASA Administrator Mike Griffin greet STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mike Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum and Stephanie Wilson. Not visible are Mission Specialists Piers Sellers and Lisa Nowak. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Discovery slows to a stop after landing on Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members aboard are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - (From left) STS-121 Mission Specialist Michael Fossum, Pilot Mark Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey are greeted by NASA Administrator Mike Griffin (foreground, right), Associate Administrator Rex Geveden and other senior managers after leaving the orbiter Discovery, in the background. The rest of the crew are Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Discovery, with Commander Steven Lindsey at the helm, approaches Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility for landing after completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The rest of the crew aboard are Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo courtesy of Nikon/Scott Andrews
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-121 crew gets a close look at the underside of the orbiter Discovery after landing. Seen are (from left) Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson, Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Michael Fossum. The post-flight walk-around is a tradition. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Discovery drops toward Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility for landing after completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members aboard are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Powers
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Mission Commander Steven Lindsey is the first of the crew to exit the crew transport vehicle brought alongside the orbiter Discovery after landing. Behind him can be seen Mission Specialist Michael Fossum. The rest of the crew are Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During the traditional post-flight walk-around after the landing of an orbiter, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak gets a close look at the nose cone. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After Discovery's safe landing on Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility, safety assessment teams dressed in protective attire and with breathing apparatus obtain vapor level readings around the orbiter and test for possible explosive or toxic gases such as hydrogen, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, nitrogen tetroxide or ammonia . Completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station, Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Following the traditional post-flight walk-around after the landing of an orbiter, the STS-121 crew pose for a photo in front of Discovery. From left are Mission Specialists Michael Fossum and Lisa Nowak, Commander Steven Lindsey, Mission Specialist Stephanie Wilson, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialist Piers Sellers. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Several hours after their successful landing at Kennedy Space Center aboard the orbiter Discovery, the crew of mission STS-121 address questions from the media about their experiences on the shuttle and the International Space Station. Seated at the conference table are (from left) Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. During the nearly 13-day mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Several hours after their successful landing at Kennedy Space Center aboard the orbiter Discovery, the crew of mission STS-121 address questions from the media about their experiences on the shuttle and the International Space Station. Seated at the conference table are (from left) Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak, Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. During the nearly 13-day mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During the traditional post-flight walk-around after the landing of an orbiter, Mission Specialist Michael Fossum (right) talks with LeRoy Cain, manager of Shuttle Launch Integration. Other crew members seen are (from left) Commander Steven Lindsey and Mission Specialists Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During the traditional post-flight walk-around after the landing of an orbiter, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin (right) shares a story with STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly, Mission Specialist Lisa Nowak and Commander Steven Lindsey. Discovery's smooth and perfect landing was on time at 9:14 a.m. EDT on Runway 15 of NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility after traveling 5.3 million miles on 202 orbits. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Discovery makes a safe landing on Runway 15 at NASA's Shuttle Landing Facility, completing mission STS-121 to the International Space Station. Discovery traveled 5.3 million miles, landing on orbit 202. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds. Main gear touchdown occurred on time at 9:14:43 EDT. Wheel stop was at 9:15:49 EDT. The returning crew members are Commander Steven Lindsey, Pilot Mark Kelly and Mission Specialists Piers Sellers, Michael Fossum, Lisa Nowak and Stephanie Wilson. Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter, who launched with the crew on July 4, remained on the station to join the Expedition 13 crew there. The landing is the 62nd at Kennedy Space Center and the 32nd for Discovery. Discovery's landing was as exhilarating as its launch, the first to take place on America's Independence Day. During the mission, the STS-121 crew tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, and delivered supplies and made repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley
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