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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers and the STS-98 crew gather for a ceremony that turns over the ?key? for the U.S. Lab Destiny to NASA. Holding the key (left) is STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell. To his left is Mission Specialist Thomas Jones; at right (in uniform) is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. Also in the group are Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. . Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. The mission will carry the U.S. Lab Destiny to the International Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.) gets a closeup view of the cover on the window of the U.S. Lab Destiny. Along with Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky, Jones is taking part in a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT) on this significant element of the International Space Station. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the station during a series of three space walks. The mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than Aug. 19, 2000
In the Space Station Pr...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.) looks up at the U.S. Lab Destiny with its debris shield blanket made of a material similar to that used in bullet-proof vests on Earth. Along with Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky, Jones is taking part in a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT) on this significant element of the International Space Station. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the Station during a series of three spacewalks. The mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion and life sciences reseach. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than August 19, 2000.
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.) looks at electrical connections on the U.S. Lab Destiny as part of a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT). Other crew members taking part in the MEIT are Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky. The remaining members of the crew (not present for the MEIT) are Mission Specialists Robert L. Curbeam Jr. and Marsha S. Ivins. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the International Space Station during a series of three space walks. The mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than Aug. 19, 2000
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.) looks over documents as part of a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT) on the U.S. Lab Destiny. Other crew members taking part in the MEIT are Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky. The remaining members of the crew (not present for the MEIT) are and Mission Specialists Robert L. Curbeam Jr. and Marsha S. Ivins. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the International Space Station during a series of three space walks. The mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than Aug. 19, 2000
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.) examines a power data grapple fixture outside the U.S. Lab Destiny. Jones is taking part in a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT), along with other crew members Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky. The remaining members of the crew (not present for the MEIT) are Mission Specialists Robert L. Curbeam Jr. and Marsha S. Ivins. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the International Space Station during a series of three space walks. The grapple fixture will be the base of operations for the robotic arm on later flights The mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than Aug. 19, 2000
In the Space Station Pr...
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STS-98 Mission Commander shows his pleasure at arriving at KSC?s Shuttle Landing Facility for Terminal Countdown Test Activities. In preparation for the Jan. 19 launch, he and the rest of the crew Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS.
STS-98 Mission Commande...
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STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is pleased to arrive at KSC?s Shuttle Landing Facility for Terminal Countdown Test Activities. In preparation for the Jan. 19 launch, he and the rest of the crew Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS.
STS-98 Pilot Mark Polan...
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The STS-98 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building dressed for a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A. From left to right, they are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialists Marsh Ivins and Robert Curbeam, being led by Commander Ken Cockrell. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the countdown and emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
The STS-98 crew wave to...
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STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones happily arrives at KSC?s Shuttle Landing Facility for Terminal Countdown Test Activities. In preparation for the Jan. 19 launch, he and the rest of the crew Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS.
STS-98 Mission Speciali...
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Members of the STS-98 crew pose in front of the M-113 armored carrier they were test driving as part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky and Commander Ken Cockrell. Not pictured is the fifth crew member, Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. The carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker, or farther, in the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch. The STS-98 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS
Members of the STS-98 c...
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Members of the STS-98 crew pause for a photo after their arrival at KSC. From left, they are Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones, and Pilot Mark Polansky. Missing is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins who was planning to arrive later. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Test Demonstration activities in preparation for launch. They will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS
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KSC?s Deputy Director James Jennings (left) welcomes STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam to KSC. The STS-98 crew Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins arrived to take part in Terminal Countdown Test Demonstration activities in preparation for launch. They will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS
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After walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-98 [ http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/sts-98.htm ] crew stops for a photograph in front of the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A [ http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/lc39a.htm ] for a simulated launch countdown. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Robert Curbeam, Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins and Commander Ken Cockrell. The crew has been taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the simulated countdown and emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny [ http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/destiny.htm ], a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
After walkout from the ...<a target="_blank" href="http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/sts-98.htm"></a><a target="_blank" href="http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/lc39a.htm"></a><a target="_blank" href="http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/../../subjects/destiny.htm"></a>
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STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam grins after his arrival at KSC?s Shuttle Landing Facility for Terminal Countdown Test Activities. In preparation for the Jan. 19 launch, he and the rest of the crew Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins will be training in emergency procedures from the pad, checking the payload and taking part in a simulated countdown. The payload for the mission is the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab has five system racks already installed inside the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the ISS.
STS-98 Mission Speciali...
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A smiling Mark Polansky, the pilot on STS-98, gets ready to take the driver?s seat in an M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-98 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sitting in the entrance to the orbiter Atlantis are (left to right) STS-98 Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins and Commander Ken Cockrell. Below them is the mission patch just placed there by Cockrell. Standing at left is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and at right Pilot Mark Polansky. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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During emergency egress training at the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, Pilot Mark Polansky settles in the slidewire basket while Commander Ken Cockrell reaches for the release handle. The basket slides along a 1200-foot wire to the landing zone below and nearby bunker. The crew has been taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the simulated countdown and emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
During emergency egress...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a media briefing at Launch Pad 39A, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (second from right) describes how the robotic arm will lift the payload from the orbiter?s bay and maneuver it into position for attachment to the International Space Station. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell answers a question from the media during a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Other crew members present are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, [Cockrell], and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Four members of the STS-98 crew pose for a photo at Launch Pad 39A. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Thomas Jones. Not pictured is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA -- After a media briefing at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-98 crew poses in the slidewire basket landing zone. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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The STS-98 crew listens to instructions on use of the slidewire basket, part of emergency egress equipment from the launch pad. At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure are Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
The STS-98 crew listens...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew poses for a group photo on the 215-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure at Launch Pad 39A. Dressed in their orange launch and entry suits are (left to right) Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them can be seen the white nose cone of a solid rocket booster and the orange external tank on Space Shuttle Atlantis. The crew is taking part in emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins waits in the White Room outside the entrance into Atlantis. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. The other crew members are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
STS-98 Mission Speciali...
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At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure, the STS-98 crew watches a slidewire basket drop to the landing zone. The basket was released by Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (center); Pilot Mark Polansky is at left. The basket is part of emergency egress equipment from the launch pad. Others (not shown) taking part in the emergency egress training are Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
At the 195-foot level o...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell places the mission patch on the entrance to the orbiter Atlantis. He and the rest of the crew Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Thomas Jones, Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam are t KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A humorous question from the media (out of view) produces smiles among the STS-98 crew during a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones (with microphone), Commander Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. All are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew talks to the press at a briefing at Launch Pad 39A. Holding the microphone is Commander Ken Cockrell, who answers a question about the mission. The other crew members are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, [Cockrell], and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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In the White Room, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky gets help with his launch and entry suit before entering Atlantis for a simulated launch countdown. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
In the White Room, STS-...
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Before entering Atlantis from the White Room for a simulated launch countdown, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky (left) poses with Travis Thompson, who is the orbiter vehicle closeout chief. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that mates with the orbiter to allow personnel to enter the orbiter?s crew compartment. Thompson is with United Space Alliance. The STS-98 crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
Before entering Atlanti...
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While trainers (bottom and right) look on, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones practices handling a piece of equipment on the U.S. Lab, Destiny, while wearing the gloves he will wear in space. Watching next to him are other crew members Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins. They are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities to become familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. With launch scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001, the STS-98 mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
While trainers (bottom ...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins wields a tool on part of the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The crew is checking out equipment inside the lab as part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment it will be handling during the mission. Others in the crew are Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers at left watch while members of the STS-98 crew check out equipment inside the U.S. Lab, Destiny (at right). The crew comprises Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. They are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-98 crew check out components inside the U.S. Lab, Destiny, under the watchful eye of trainers. The crew comprises Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. They are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-98 crew check out equipment in the U.S. Lab, Destiny, with the help of workers. In the background, looking over her shoulder, is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. Others in the crew are Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. The crew is taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment it will be handling during the mission. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins maneuvers a part of the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The crew is checking out equipment inside the lab as part of Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment it will be handling during the mission. Others in the crew are Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers in the foreground watch and wait while members of the STS-98 crew check out the U.S. Lab, Destiny in the background. The crew comprises Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. They are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker is surprised by the camera as she exits the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Inside the lab is the STS-98 crew, which is taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, becoming familiar with equipment it will be handling during the mission. The crew comprises Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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Inside the U.S. Lab, Destiny, members of the STS-98 crew work with technicians (in the background) to learn more about the equipment in the module. They are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. At left, back to camera, is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. Standing are Mission Specialists Thomas Jones (left) and Robert Curbeam (right). Other crew members not seen are Commander Ken Cockrell and Pilot Mark Polansky. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
Inside the U.S. Lab, De...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-98 crew, sitting in front of the U.S. Lab, Destiny, listen to a trainer during Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities. Seen, left to right, are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins (with camera). The CEIT allows a crew to become familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. With launch scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001, the STS-98 mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
In the Space Station Pr...
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In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones works on a part of the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Watching at right is Pilot Mark Polansky. Jones and Polansky, along with other crew members, are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities to become familiar with equipment they will be handling during the mission. Others in the crew are Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins. The mission will be transporting the Lab to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. With delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated. The STS-98 launch is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001
In the Space Station Pr...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, the STS-98 crew talks with United Space Alliance worker Larry Oshein (right). Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialist Tom Jones, and Mission Specialists Mark Polansky and Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew, with United Space Alliance worker Larry Oshein (center), poses underneath orbiter Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. From left, they are Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialist Tom Jones, Oshein, and Mission Specialists Mark Polansky and Marsha Ivins. The crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch of Atlantis on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky inspects the window in the cockpit of Atlantis. He and the rest of the crew are at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the slidewire basket landing zone at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-98 crew gathers for a media briefing. With the microphone is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, who is talking about some of his activities during the mission. The others are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. The landing zone provides an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew (right) gathers at Launch Pad 39A for a media briefing before continuing their emergency egress training. Facing an audience (left) of photographers, videographers and writers, along with KSC media escorts, are (left to right) Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins, Commander Ken Cockrell, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones and Pilot Mark Polansky. They are standing in the landing zone for the slidewire baskets that provide an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. The crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-98 crew gathers at Launch Pad 39A for a media briefing before continuing their emergency egress training. Facing an audience (foreground) of photographers, videographers and writers are (left to right) Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. In the background is the Fixed Service Structure with its 80-foot lightning mast on top. The Space Shuttle is hidden behind it. The crew is standing in the landing zone for the slidewire baskets that provide an escape route for personnel aboard the Space Shuttle and orbiter access arm until 30 seconds before launch. They are at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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