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STS-109 Preflight Training Activities
STS-109 Preflight Train...
06/22/01
 
Year 2001
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-109 Mission Specialist Nancy Currie is ready to practice driving the M-113 armored personnel carrier, part of emergency egress training at the launch pad. Crew members are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. STS-109 is a Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission, with goals to replace Solar Array 2 with Solar Array 3, replace the Power Control Unit, remove the Faint Object Camera and install the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), install the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cooling System, and install New Outer Blanket Layer insulation. The 11-day mission will require grasping the satellite with a robotic arm in order for the crew to perform the tasks during five spacewalks. Launch of STS-109 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for Feb. 28, 2002
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - STS-109 Mission Specialist Nancy Currie arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to begin launch preparations. This is Currie's fourth Shuttle flight. The goal of the 11-day mission is repair and maintenance on the Hubble Space Telescope. Five spacewalks are planned to replace Solar Array 2 with Solar Array 3, replace the Power Control Unit, remove the Faint Object Camera and install the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), install the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cooling System, and install New Outer Blanket Layer insulation. Launch is scheduled for Feb. 28 at 6:48 a.m. EST
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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Mission Specialist Nancy Currie and Commander Bob Cabana participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for STS-88 in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. Here, Currie and Cabana inspect one of the six hatches on Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS). STS-88, the first ISS assembly flight, is targeted for launch in July 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour
Mission Specialist Nanc...
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STS-88 crew members and Boeing Manufacturing Engineer Harry Feinberg enjoy a moment inside Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) during the mission's Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. Discussing the mission are, from left to right, Feinberg, Commander Bob Cabana, Mission Specialist Nancy Currie, and Pilot Rick Sturckow. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-88, the first ISS assembly flight, is targeted for launch in July 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour
STS-88 crew members and...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
STS-88 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for that mission in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. Discussing the mission are, from left to right, Pilot Rick Sturckow, Mission Specialists Jerry Ross and Nancy Currie, and Commander Bob Cabana. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-88, the first ISS assembly flight, is targeted for launch in July 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour
STS-88 crew members par...
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International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-97PC-944 (June 26, 1997) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL -- Members of the STS-88 crew, from left Pilot Rick Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy Currie, Commander Bob Cabana and Mission Specialist Jim Newman, pose with the Node 1 of the International Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements.
International Space Sta...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description KSC-97PC-942 (June 26, 1997) --- KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL -- Members of the STS-88 crew, from left Mission Specialist Jim Newman, Commander Bob Cabana, Mission Specialist Nancy Currie and Pilot Rick Sturckow, examine the Node 1 of the International Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements.
STS-88 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description STS088-E-5019 (12-05-98) --- This medium closeup electronic still camera (ESC) photograph shows Endeavour's docking system in the cargo bay. Though partially obscured, Unity can be seen in its stowed position in aft payload pay. The arm of the remote manipulator system (RMS) is seen in its berthed position on the right. The photo was taken prior to astronaut Nancy Currie's moving of the 12.8-ton Unity connecting module to link it with Endeavour's docking system. The photo was taken at 09:36:33 GMT, Dec. 5, and downlinked later to flight controllers in Houston.
STS-88 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description s99_03776 In December 1998, the crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-88 began construction of the International Space Station, joining the U.S.-built Unity node to the Russian-built Zarya module. The crew carried a large-format IMAX? camera from which this picture was taken. - With Unity in place, Astronaut Nancy Currie begins positioning Zarya for mating
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