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Browse All : Images by Neil A. Armstrong

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Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
8/1/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
girl scouts, poetry
girl scouts, poetry
12/16/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Apollo -- July 1969
Apollo -- July 1969
Apollo -- July 1969
7/16/08
NASA
 
Year 2008
Apollo 11 Launch
Apollo 11 Launch
Apollo, moon, Saturn V
1/1/94
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 1994
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - TRAINING - WATER EGRESS - COMMAND PILOT
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - TRAINI...
1965
 
Year 1965
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - TRAINING - WATER EGRESS
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - TRAINI...
1965
 
Year 1965
GEMINI-TITAN GT-VIII - PRELAUNCH ACTIVITY - CAPE
GEMINI-TITAN GT-VIII - ...
1966
 
Year 1966
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - PRELAUNCH ACTIVITY
GEMINI-TITAN-8 - PRELAU...
05/19/05
 
Year 1966
Gemini 8 spacecraft hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason
Gemini 8 spacecraft hoi...
1966
 
Year 1966
Astronauts Armstrong and Scott during photo session outside KSC
Astronauts Armstrong an...
03/11/66
 
Year 1966
Gemini 8 spacecraft hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Leonard F. Mason
Gemini 8 spacecraft hoi...
03/16/66
 
Year 1966
Apollo 11 Mission image - Spacecraft interior with astronaut Neil A. Armstrong looking at camera
Apollo 11 Mission image...
05/22/69
 
Year 1969
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr.,Lunar Module pilot,works inside the Lunar Module LM during checkout and inspection after hatch opening. Image taken during the transluner phase of the Apollo 11 Mission by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 Mission. Original film magazine was labeled N; Film type: S0-368 Color; 80mm lens.
Astronaut Edwin E. Aldr...
07/20/69
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin inside the Lunar Module
Apollo 11 Mission image...
07/20/69
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin inside the Lunar Module
Apollo 11 Mission image...
07/20/69
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Neil A. Armstrong inside the Lunar Module after EVA
Apollo 11 Mission image...
07/20/69
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Neil Armstrong works at the Lunar Module
Apollo 11 Mission image...
07/20/69
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon Module
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
07/20/1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar surface and horizon
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar Module at Tranquility Base
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Mission image - Lunar Module at Tranquility Base
Apollo 11 Mission image...
1969
 
Year 1969
Apollo 11 Crew During Training Exercise
Apollo 11 Crew During T...
Apollo 11
04/22/1969
NASA
 
NASA Center Johnson Space Center
Members of the Rogers Commission arrive at KSC
Members of the Rogers C...
Challenger STS-51-L
03/07/1986
NASA
 
NASA Center Kennedy Space Center
Apollo 11 LM Interior
Apollo 11 LM Interior
Apollo 11
7/20/1969
Neil A. Armstrong
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Pilot Neil Armstrong with X-15 #1
Pilot Neil Armstrong wi...
Astronauts
01/01/1960
USAF
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Apollo 11 Astronauts Swarmed by Thousands In Mexico City Parade.
Apollo 11 Astronauts Sw...
Apollo 11
09/23/1969
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Gold Olive Branch Left on the Moon by Neil Armstrong
Gold Olive Branch Left ...
Apollo 11
04/16/1971
NASA
 
NASA Center Johnson Space Center
Apollo 11 Astronauts Receive a Papal Audience by Pope Paul VI
Apollo 11 Astronauts Re...
Apollo 11
10/16/1969
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Neil Armstrong
Neil Armstrong
Astronauts
2/12/1969
 
NASA Center Langley Research Center
Armstrong Awarded Space Medal of Honor
Armstrong Awarded Space...
Apollo 11
10/1/1978
NASA
 
NASA Center Kennedy Space Center
Nixon Telephones Armstrong on the Moon
Nixon Telephones Armstr...
[Apollo 11, Presidents]
01/01/1969
NASA
 
NASA Center Headquarters
Pilot Neil Armstrong and X-15 #1
Pilot Neil Armstrong an...
[Astronauts, Top 20 Dry...
01/01/1960
NASA
 
NASA Center Dryden Flight Research Center
Official Portrait of Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin
Official Portrait of As...
1967-01-09
 
Apollo 11 Commander Armstrong Presents President With Commemorative Plaque
Apollo 11 Commander Arm...
1974-06-04
 
Former Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong Visits MSFC
Former Astronaut Neil A...
2007-07-19
 
Official Portrait of Astronaut Neil Armstrong
Official Portrait of As...
1969-01-09
 
Neil A. Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1955. He transferred to the NACA High-Speed Flight Station at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in July 1955, as an aeronautical research scientist. He became a research pilot later that year. Neil was named as one of nine astronauts for NASA's Gemini and Apollo Projects, leaving the Center for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas, in September 1962. Upon graduation from High School in 1947, Armstrong received a scholarship from the U.S. Navy. He enrolled at Purdue University to begin the study of aeronautical engineering. In 1949, the Navy called him to active duty and he became a navy pilot. In 1950, he was sent to Korea where he flew 78 combat missions from the carrier USS Essex in a Grumman F9F-2 Panther. He received the Air Medal and two Gold Stars. In 1952, Armstrong returned to Purdue University and graduated with a bachelors degree in aeronautical engineering in 1955. He later earned a masters degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California. At the High-Speed Flight Station (which later became the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center) Armstrong served as project pilot on the North American F-100A and -C aircraft, McDonnell F-101, and the Lockheed F-104A. He also flew the Bell X-1B (4 flights, first on August 15, 1957), Bell X-5 (one flight, the last in the program, on October 25, 1955) and the Paresev. On November 30, 1960, Armstrong made his first flight in the X-15. He made a total of seven flights in the rocket plane reaching an altitude of 207,500 feet in the X-15-3 and a Mach number of 5.74 (3,989 mph) in the X-15-1. He left the Flight Research Center with a total of 2450 flying hours in more than 50 aircraft types. He was a member of the USAF-NASA Dyna-Soar Pilot Consultant Group, and studied X-20 Dyna-Soar approaches and abort maneuvers through use of the F-102A and F5D jet aircraft. Armstrong later accumulated a total of 8 days and 14 hours in space, including 2 hours and 48 minutes walking on the Moon. In March 1966, he was commander of the Gemini 8 mission that performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. As spacecraft commander for the Apollo 11 lunar mission, on July 20, 1969, he became the first human to set foot on the Moon. In 1970 he was appointed Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics at NASA Headquarters. He resigned in 1971. Neil wrote several technical reports and presented a number of research papers. In June 1962, the Octave Chanute Award was presented to Neil by the Institute of the Aerospace Sciences. Other awards received by Neil have included the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal.
Neil A. Armstrong
1958
 
Description Neil A. Armstrong joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1955. He transferred to the NACA High-Speed Flight Station at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in July 1955, as an aeronautical research scientist. He became a research pilot later that year. Neil was named as one of nine astronauts for NASA's Gemini and Apollo Projects, leaving the Center for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas, in September 1962. Upon graduation from High School in 1947, Armstrong received a scholarship from the U.S. Navy. He enrolled at Purdue University to begin the study of aeronautical engineering. In 1949, the Navy called him to active duty and he became a navy pilot. In 1950, he was sent to Korea where he flew 78 combat missions from the carrier USS Essex in a Grumman F9F-2 Panther. He received the Air Medal and two Gold Stars. In 1952, Armstrong returned to Purdue University and graduated with a bachelors degree in aeronautical engineering in 1955. He later earned a masters degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California. At the High-Speed Flight Station (which later became the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center) Armstrong served as project pilot on the North American F-100A and -C aircraft, McDonnell F-101, and the Lockheed F-104A. He also flew the Bell X-1B (4 flights, first on August 15, 1957), Bell X-5 (one flight, the last in the program, on October 25, 1955) and the Paresev. On November 30, 1960, Armstrong made his first flight in the X-15. He made a total of seven flights in the rocket plane reaching an altitude of 207,500 feet in the X-15-3 and a Mach number of 5.74 (3,989 mph) in the X-15-1. He left the Flight Research Center with a total of 2450 flying hours in more than 50 aircraft types. He was a member of the USAF-NASA Dyna-Soar Pilot Consultant Group, and studied X-20 Dyna-Soar approaches and abort maneuvers through use of the F-102A and F5D jet aircraft. Armstrong later accumulated a total of 8 days and 14 hours in space, including 2 hours and 48 minutes walking on the Moon. In March 1966, he was commander of the Gemini 8 mission that performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. As spacecraft commander for the Apollo 11 lunar mission, on July 20, 1969, he became the first human to set foot on the Moon. In 1970 he was appointed Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics at NASA Headquarters. He resigned in 1971. Neil wrote several technical reports and presented a number of research papers. In June 1962, the Octave Chanute Award was presented to Neil by the Institute of the Aerospace Sciences. Other awards received by Neil have included the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal.
This U.S. Air Force photo shows the X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) in flight over the desert in the 1960s. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John "Jack" McKay, Joseph Engle, William "Pete" Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 Novemeber 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 "seems squirrelly" and then said "I'm in a spin." Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided
X-15 #3 in flight (USAF...
1960s
 
Description This U.S. Air Force photo shows the X-15 ship #3 (56-6672) in flight over the desert in the 1960s. Ship #3 made 65 flights during the program, attaining a top speed of Mach 5.65 and a maximum altitude of 354,200 feet. Only 10 of the 12 X-15 pilots flew Ship #3, and only eight of them earned their astronaut wings during the program. Robert White, Joseph Walker, Robert Rushworth, John "Jack" McKay, Joseph Engle, William "Pete" Knight, William Dana, and Michael Adams all earned their astronaut wings in Ship #3. Neil Armstrong and Milton Thompson also flew Ship #3. In fact, Armstrong piloted Ship #3 on its first flight, on 20 December 1961. On 15 Novemeber 1967, Ship #3 was launched over Delamar Lake, Nevada with Maj. Michael J. Adams at the controls. The vehicle soon reached a speed of Mach 5.2, and a peak altitude of 266,000 feet. During the climb, an electrical disturbance degraded the aircraft's controllability. Ship #3 began a slow drift in heading, which soon became a spin. Adams radioed that the X-15 "seems squirrelly" and then said "I'm in a spin." Through some combination of pilot technique and basic aerodynamic stability, Adams recovered from the spin and entered an inverted Mach 4.7 dive. As the X-15 plummeted into the increasingly thicker atmosphere, the Honeywell adaptive flight control system caused the vehicle to begin oscillating. As the pitching motion increased, aerodynamic forces finally broke the aircraft into several major pieces. Adams was killed when the forward fuselage impacted the desert. This was the only fatal accident during the entire X-15 program. The X-15 was a rocket-powered aircraft 50 ft long with a wingspan of 22 ft. It was a missile-shaped vehicle with an unusual wedge-shaped vertical tail, thin stubby wings, and unique side fairings that extended along the side of the fuselage. The X-15 weighed about 14,000 lb empty and approximately 34,000 lb at launch. The XLR-99 rocket engine, manufactured by Thiokol Chemical Corp., was pilot controlled and was capable of developing 57,000 lb of thrust. North American Aviation built three X-15 aircraft for the program. The X-15 research aircraft was developed to provide in-flight information and data on aerodynamics, structures, flight controls, and the physiological aspects of high-speed, high-altitude flight. A follow-on program used the aircraft as a testbed to carry various scientific experiments beyond the Earth's atmosphere on a repeated basis. For flight in the dense air of the usable atmosphere, the X-15 used conventional aerodynamic controls such as rudder surfaces on the vertical stabilizers to control yaw and movable horizontal stabilizers to control pitch when moving in synchronization or roll when moved differentially. For flight in the thin air outside of the appreciable Earth's atmosphere, the X-15 used a reaction control system. Hydrogen peroxide thrust rockets located on the nose of the aircraft provided pitch and yaw control. Those on the wings provided
Astronaut Neil Armstron...
December 2, 1966
 
F5D Skylancer with came...
September 1, 1961
 
F5D Skylancer NASA 212 ...
August 7, 1961
 
F5D Skylancer in flight...
February 1971
 
F5D Skylancer #213 taxi...
March 1, 1962
 
X-15 on ground with res...
NASA research pilot Nei...
1960
 
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