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STS-116 crew visits SSC
STS-116 crew visits SSC
STS-116 crew, space shu...
1/30/07
NASA/Stennis Space Cent...
 
Year 2007
MS Curbeam during EVA
MS Curbeam during EVA
02/12/01
 
Year 2001
STS-98 MS Curbeam is ready to drive an M-113 during TCDT
STS-98 MS Curbeam is re...
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
01.04.2001
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STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (right) takes a turn driving an M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. Seated alongside is Capt. George Hoggard (left), a training officer with SGS Fire Services. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther. The STS-98 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS
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Robert Curbeam, a Mission Specialist on STS-98, gets ready to take the driver?s seat in an M-113 armored carrier, part of emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. In the event of an emergency at the pad prior to launch, the carrier could be used to transport the crew to a nearby bunker or farther,. The STS-98 crew is at KSC to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes a simulated launch countdown. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab Destiny, a key element in the construction of the ISS
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis, STS-98 Mission Specialists Thomas Jones (left) and Robert Curbeam (right) talk about their mission, attaching the U.S. Lab Destiny (in the background) to the International Space Station. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. A key element in the construction of the International Space Station, Destiny is a pressurized module designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The module already has five system racks installed inside. Launch of STS-98 on its 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the payload bay of Atlantis, two workers (background and right) watch STS-98 Robert Curbeam practice work he will do on the U.S. Lab Destiny in space. The mission payload, Destiny is a key element in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab is a pressurized module designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The module already has five system racks installed inside. The STS-98 crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. Launch of STS-98 on its 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam works with equipment he will use in space to attach the U.S. Lab Destiny to the International Space Station. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. A key element in the construction of the International Space Station, Destiny is a pressurized module designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The module already has five system racks installed inside. Launch of STS-98 on its 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam works with equipment he will use in space to attach the U.S. Lab Destiny to the International Space Station. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. A key element in the construction of the International Space Station, Destiny is a pressurized module designed to accommodate pressurized payloads. It has a capacity of 24 rack locations. Payload racks will occupy 13 locations especially designed to support experiments. The module already has five system racks installed inside. Launch of STS-98 on its 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-98 Mission Specialists Tom Jones (second from left) and Robert Curbeam (right) test tools that will be used during extravehicular activities (EVA) on their mission. Scheduled for launch Jan. 18, 2001, STS-98 will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-98 Mission Specialists Tom Jones and Robert Curbeam test tools that will be used during extravehicular activities (EVA) on their mission. Scheduled for launch Jan. 18, 2001, STS-98 will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the STS-98 crew look over the Canadian robotic arm in the payload bay of orbiter Atlantis, which is undergoing testing in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. At right, pointing, is Mission Specialist Tom Jones. Second from right is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. They and the rest of the crew are at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Working on the Orbiter Docking System of orbiter Atlantis are Mission Specialists Tom Jones (leaning over) and Robert Curbeam. They and the rest of the crew are at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-98 Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam (center left) and Tom Jones (center right) practice with tools that will be used on extravehicular activities on their mission. The STS-98 crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities. Launch on mission STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 18, 2001. It will be transporting the U.S. Lab, Destiny, to the International Space Station with five system racks already installed inside of the module. After delivery of electronics in the lab, electrically powered attitude control for Control Moment Gyroscopes will be activated
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Suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam has a thumbs-up for launch. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program
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In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam sends a message to his wife before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-116 crew pose in front of trusses they will be working with during their mission to the International Space Station. From left are Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, with the European Space Agency, Pilot William Oefelein and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The 19th assembly flight to the ISS, the mission will deliver the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, to attach to second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to be assembled in an earlier mission. STS-116 is scheduled for launch in June 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-116 crew look over trusses P4 and P5 they will be working with during their mission to the International Space Station. At left is Pilot William Oefelein; on the right are Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, with the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The 19th assembly flight to the ISS, the mission will deliver the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, to attach to second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to be assembled in an earlier mission. STS-116 is scheduled for launch in June 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-116 crew check out equipment they will be working with during their mission to the International Space Station. At left are Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, with the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and Pilot William Oelefein. The 19th assembly flight to the ISS, the mission will deliver the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, to attach to second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to be assembled in an earlier mission. STS-116 is scheduled for launch in June 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), STS-116 Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, with the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam and Pilot William Oelefein look over equipment they will be working with during their mission to the International Space Station. The 19th assembly flight to the ISS, the mission will deliver the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, to attach to second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to be assembled in an earlier mission. STS-116 is scheduled for launch in June 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-116 crew look over equipment they will be working with during their mission to the International Space Station. On the stand at left is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The 19th assembly flight to the ISS, the mission will deliver the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, to attach to second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss, to be assembled in an earlier mission. STS-116 is scheduled for launch in June 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (center, foreground) and Pilot William Oefelein (right, foreground), check out equipment for the mission during a Crew Equipment Interface Test activity. Mission STS-116 is the 19th assembly flight to the International Space Station, delivering the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, that will be attached to the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss. The mission will also deliver the eighth expedition crew to the ISS and return Expedition 7. STS-116 is scheduled for launch July 24, 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam works on equipment for the mission during a Crew Equipment Interface Test activity. Mission STS-116 is the 19th assembly flight to the International Space Station, delivering the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, that will be attached to the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 Truss. The mission will also deliver the eighth expedition crew to the ISS and return Expedition 7. STS-116 is scheduled for launch July 24, 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam handles a piece of equipment in the SPACEHAB module. He and other crew members are taking part in equipment familiarization. Objective of their mission to the International Space Station is to deliver and attach the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, deactivate and retract P6 Truss Channel 4B (port-side) solar array, reconfigure station power from 2A and 4A solar arrays, deliver the Expedition 8 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 7 crew to Earth. The mission is currently targeted for launch in July 2003.
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KKENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-116 crew members listen to instructions from a trainer (left) about equipment in the SPACEHAB module. Starting second from left are Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, who is with the European Space Agency, Pilot William Oefelein, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam an Mission Commander Terrence Wilcutt. Objective of their mission to the International Space Station is to deliver and attach the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, deactivate and retract P6 Truss Channel 4B (port-side) solar array, reconfigure station power from 2A and 4A solar arrays, deliver the Expedition 8 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 7 crew to Earth. The mission is currently targeted for launch in July 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-116 crew members take part in equipment familiarization in the SPACEHAB module. From left are Mission Commander Terrence Wilcutt, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, Pilot William Oefelein and Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang, who is with the European Space Agency. At right is a SPACEHAB trainer. Objective of their mission to the International Space Station is to deliver and attach the third port truss segment, the P5 Truss, deactivate and retract P6 Truss Channel 4B (port-side) solar array, reconfigure station power from 2A and 4A solar arrays, deliver the Expedition 8 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 7 crew to Earth. The mission is currently targeted for launch in July 2003.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam (in back) arrives at Kennedy Space Center?s Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet for the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam arrives at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral, Fla., to participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Kennedy Space Center?s Shuttle Landing Facility, Deputy Director William Parsons (left) greets STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam after his arrival for the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam practices photographing the orbiter Discovery with a camera similar to those the crew will use on the mission. The crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 crew members are lowered into Discovery?s payload bay for a closer look. In the white cap is Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang; at right is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. Fugelsang represents the European Space Agency. A CEIT allows astronauts to become familiar with equipment and hardware they will use on the mission. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 crew members get information about the orbiter boom sensor system in Discovery?s payload bay. In the center are Mission Specialists Christer Fugelsang, who represents the European Space Agency, and Robert Curbeam. A CEIT allows astronauts to become familiar with equipment and hardware they will use on the mission. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-116 crew members (at right) are briefed on the cameras they will be using during the mission. The astronauts are, from left, Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Christer Fugelsang and Pilot William Oefelein. The crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 crew members are looking closely at the orbiter boom sensor system in Discovery?s payload bay. Seen in front are Mission Specialists Christer Fugelsang, who represents the European Space Agency, and Robert Curbeam. A CEIT allows astronauts to become familiar with equipment and hardware they will use on the mission. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang practices photographing the orbiter Discovery with a camera similar to those the crew will use on the mission. At right is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. The crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Sunita Williams inspect flight hardware during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Space Coast to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 crew members get information about the external air lock they are looking at. At left is Mission Specialist Christer Fugelsang and at right is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam. Fugelsang represents the European Space Agency. A CEIT allows astronauts to become familiar with equipment and hardware they will use on the mission. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-116 Pilot William Oefelein (left) gets a close look at the underside of the orbiter Discovery. At right, Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Christer Fugelsang are practicing with cameras similar to those the crew will use on the mission. Fugelsang represents the European Space Agency. The crew is at KSC for a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., STS-116 Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam (left) and Christer Fugelsang look over the Integrated Cargo Carrier during the Crew Equipment Interface Test. The ICC will be carried in Space Shuttle Discovery?s payload cargo bay during the mission to the International Space Station. Mission crews make frequent trips to the Kennedy Space Center to become familiar with the equipment and payloads they will be using. STS-116 will be mission No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-116 mission crew practices for launch with a simulation of activities, from crew breakfast and suit-up to countdown in the orbiter. In this photo Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam has his helmet adjusted before heading to Launch Pad 39B. The STS-116 mission is No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the white room on Launch Pad 39B, STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam is helped with his gear before entering Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission crew is taking part in a simulated launch countdown, part of the terminal countdown demonstration test that includes prelaunch preparations. The STS-116 mission is No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft for the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on Dec. 7. On the mission, he and other crew members will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the 195-foot level of the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B, STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam heads for the slidewire baskets. He and other crew members are practicing the emergency egress procedure to get off the pad, part of the prelaunch preparations known as terminal countdown demonstration test. The TCDT includes a simulated launch countdown and payload familiarization. The STS-116 mission is No. 20 to the International Space Station and construction flight 12A.1. The mission payload is the SPACEHAB module, the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. Launch is scheduled for no earlier than Dec. 7. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for launch at 9:35 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, after donning his helmet. Curbeam will be making his third shuttle flight. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2003. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for launch at 9:35 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, waiting for the suit technician to place the helmet. Curbeam will be making his third shuttle flight. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2003. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for a second launch attempt at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, who is helped with his boot. Curbeam is making his third shuttle flight. The first launch attempt of STS-116 on Dec. 7 was postponed due a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2002. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for a second launch attempt at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, after donning his helmet. Curbeam will be making his third shuttle flight. The first launch attempt of STS-116 on Dec. 7 was postponed due a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2002. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for a second launch attempt at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, getting help with the helmet. Curbeam will be making his third shuttle flight. The first launch attempt of STS-116 on Dec. 7 was postponed due a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2002. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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NASA or National Aerona...
 
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The crew members of mission STS-116 are suiting up for a second launch attempt at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured here is Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, who is making his third shuttle flight. The first launch attempt of STS-116 on Dec. 7 was postponed due a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2002. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 19 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-116 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam thanks the closeout crew for their help in completing his suitup before climbing into Space Shuttle Discovery. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The first launch attempt of STS-116 on Dec. 7 was postponed due a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. This second launch attempt is scheduled for 8:47 p.m. This is Discovery's 33rd mission and the first night launch since 2002. The 20th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, STS-116 carries another truss segment, P5. It will serve as a spacer, mated to the P4 truss that was attached in September. After installing the P5, the crew will reconfigure and redistribute the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. Landing is expected Dec. 21 at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, F...
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