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Glenn and STS-95 Go to Space
Glenn and STS-95 Go to ...
10/29/09
NASA
 
Year 2009
Lindsey writes in the ISS Ships Log during STS-121 / Expedition 13 joint operations
Lindsey writes in the I...
07/14/06
 
Year 2006
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Commander Steven Lindsey arrives at KSC?s Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and the rest of the crew are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities such as payload familiarization. The Joint Airlock Module is the primary payload on their mission, scheduled to launch no earlier than June 14, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test activity, STS-119 Commander Steven Lindsey (center) and Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega (right) listen to instructions on the equipment that will be part of the mission. Scheduled to launch in January 2004, the mission will deliver the fourth and final set of U.S. solar arrays along with the fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 truss.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During a Crew Equipment Interface Test activity, STS-119 Commander Steven Lindsey watches as Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega works with a tool on the equipment that will be part of the mission. Scheduled to launch in January 2004, the mission will deliver the fourth and final set of U.S. solar arrays along with the fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 truss.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew look at elements inside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, which is part of the payload on the mission. The crew is at KSC to take part in Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which provide hands-on experience with equipment they will use on-orbit. Seen pointing is Mission Commander Steven Lindsey. STS-121, the second Return to Flight mission, is targeted for launch in a lighted planning window of Sept. 9 to Sept. 25.
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Mission Commander Steven Lindsey talks to the media from the launch pad. He is in the landing area of the slidewire baskets. The crew is at Kennedy for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. Over several days, the crew will practice emergency egress from the pad and suit up in their orange flight suits for the simulated countdown to launch. Space Shuttle Discovery is designated to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. It will carry supplies to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey gets ready for a training flight in a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He will be practicing landing the orbiter using the STA, which is a modified Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Space Shuttle Discovery is scheduled to launch July 1 on mission STS-121. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey takes his turn driving an M-113, which is an armored personnel carrier. The STS-121 crew is taking turns driving the M-113 as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency egress training from the pad and a simulated countdown. Mission STS-121 is designated for launch on July 1. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey (left) and Pilot Mark Kelly take part in emergency egress practice, part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include a simulated countdown culminating in main engine cutoff. Mission STS-121 is scheduled to be launched July 1. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility to get ready for launch July 1, STS-121 Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter (second from left) and Commander Steven Lindsey are greeted (at right) by Center Director Jim Kennedy and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. This mission is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Mission Specialist Thomas Reiter arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft piloted by Commander Steven Lindsey. The July 1 launch will be his first space flight. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. This mission is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to get ready for launch on July 1. The launch will be the fourth for Lindsey. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. This mission is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly (left) and Commander Steven Lindsey look at the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) they will be flying to practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is ready for takeoff from the Shuttle Landing Facility. Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the cockpit of the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly is ready for takeoff from the Shuttle Landing Facility. Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly heads across the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the pre-dawn hours, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey walks across the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Pilot Mark Kelly takes control in the cockpit. Kelly and Commander Steven Lindsey will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - As dawn washes the sky in pink, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is ready for his first flight in the Shuttle Training Aircraft today to practice landing a shuttle in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA), STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey settles into his seat in the cockpit. Lindsey and Pilot Mark Kelly will be making practice landings in preparation for the July 1 launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter?s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter?s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is donning his launch and entry suit for launch today on Space Shuttle Discovery. Lindsey is making his fourth space flight. The launch is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey adjusts a glove during suitup for a second launch attempt on Space Shuttle Discovery. The first launch attempt July 1 was scrubbed due to weather concerns and postponed 24 hours. The launch is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey adjusts his glove as he dons his launch and entry suit for launch today on Space Shuttle Discovery. Lindsey is making his fourth space flight. The launch is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is eager for a third launch attempt on the mission. Here, he is donning his launch suit before heading to Launch Pad 39B. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Prior to the third launch attempt on mission STS-121, Commander Steven Lindsey looks thoughtful as he completes suiting up before heading to Launch Pad 39B. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is eager for a third launch attempt on the mission. Here, he is donning his launch suit before heading to Launch Pad 39B. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is helped with his boot during suitup before heading to Launch Pad 39B and the third attempt at liftoff on mission STS-121. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett
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Steven Lindsey, the pilot of the STS-87 crew, participates in a news briefing at Launch Pad 39B during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). A major in the U.S. Air Force, Lindsey became an astronaut in May 1996. This is his first flight on the Space Shuttle, but he previously has logged more than 2,700 hours of flying time in 49 different types of aircraft. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight providing the crew of each mission opportunities to participate in simulated countdown activities. The TCDT ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cut-off. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the pad and has an opportunity to view and inspect the payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-87 is scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia from pad 39B at KSC
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STS-87 Pilot Steven Lindsey is inspected before launch in his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Travis Thompson, USA orbiter vehicle closeout chief. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. Although this is his first Shuttle flight, Lindsey has logged more than 2,700 hours of flying time in 49 different types of aircraft
STS-87 Pilot Steven Lin...
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STS-87 Pilot Steven Lindsey dons his launch and entry suit with the help of two assistants in the Operations and Checkout Building. Shortly, he and the five other crew members of STS-87 will depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Although this is his first Shuttle flight, Lindsey has logged more than 2,700 hours of flying time in 49 different types of aircraft
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(Foreground) STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. inspects the window of the orbiter Discovery during a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their mission. Pilot Steven Lindsey is in the background. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads on which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission, aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process
(Foreground) STS-95 Mis...
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STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) and Pilot Steven Lindsey (right) are in Discovery's midbody checking electrical connections during a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their mission. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads on which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission, aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process
STS-95 Mission Commande...
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(Foreground) STS-95 Pilot Steven Lindsey inspects the window of the orbiter Discovery during a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for their mission. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads on which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission, aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility (SPPF), Cape Canaveral, STS-95 Pilot Steven Lindsey (right) and a KSC worker (left) look over documentation, while other crew members (in the background) check out equipment. Lindsey and the rest of the crew have been participating in SPACEHAB familiarization in the SPPF. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility (SPPF), Cape Canaveral, STS-95 Pilot Steven Lindsey (right) photographs BRIC (Biological Research in Canisters) experiments while a representative of the National Space Agency of Japan (NASDA) looks on. Lindsey, along with other crew members, have been participating in SPACEHAB familiarization in the SPPF. The mission, scheduled to launch Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process
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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39B, STS-121 Commander Steven Lindsey is helped by the Closeout Crew to prepare his launch suit for entering Discovery and the launch. Situated on the end of the orbiter access arm, the White Room provides access into the orbiter on the pad. The crew is preparing for the third launch attempt in four days; previous attempts were scrubbed due to weather concerns. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Regina Mitchell-Ryall & Tony Gray
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STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-07-12 0:0:0
 
Description JSC2006-E-22058 (8 June 2006) --- The STS-121 crew greets reporters during its preflight briefing at the Johnson Space Center. On the dais, moving left from right foreground are astronauts Steven Lindsey, commander; Mark E. Kelly, pilot; and Michael E. Fossum, Lisa M. Nowak, Stephanie D. Wilson, Piers J. Sellers and Thomas Reiter, all mission specialists. Once the crew of seven docks with the International Space Station, Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency, will remain onboard to serve as a member of the Expedition 13 crew.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14555 (July 98) Several days before a flight in a T-38 jet aircraft, U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., STS-95 payload specialist, is briefed on operation of the jet trainer by instructor David L. Mumme. Though seated in the front for this portion of the briefing, Glenn occupied the rear station for the actual flight, which was piloted by astronaut Curtis L. Brown, mission commander. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14554 (July 1998) --- At the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility, several STS-95 crew members get a close look at the new generation fold-up seat like those to be used aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery for the scheduled Oct. 29 launch. In the center and right foreground are astronauts Steven Lindsey, pilot, and Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist Others, from the left, are U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist who will be seated in the mid deck for both Discovery's ascent and descent stages; astronaut Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA;) and A. Flagler, who gave a brief demonstration of the seat. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14556 (July 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist, and other STS-95 crew members (out of frame) are briefed by investigators of a crystal growth experiment to be carried aboard the Discovery for the STS-95 mission. Crew members (seated, from the left) are U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist; and Scott F. Parazynski and Stephen Robinson, both mission specialists. This training took place in the flight operations facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14550 (June 1998) --- STS-95 crew members work with navigational hardware which will be used during Discovery's operations with the STS-95 free-flying Spartan payload. From the left are astronauts Curtis L. Brown, mission commander; Stephen K. Robinson and Scott F. Parazynski, both mission specialists; and Steven Lindsey, pilot. The photo was taqken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14545 (June 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., STS-95 payload specialist, trains with an electronic still camera (ESC) in the full fuselage trainer (FFT) at the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility. He is taking instructions from David Williams, who is involved with training the STS-95 crew members on photography and video activity. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14546 (June 1998) --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown (center), mission commander, directs a classroom session with the STS-95 crew members. He is flanked here by U.S. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist; and Chiaki Mukai, payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14547 (June 1998) --- A. Flagler, right, briefs several members of the STS-95 crew on procedures involved in emergency egress from a troubled Space Shuttle during a training exercise at the Johnson Space Center's systems integraton facility. From the left are Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA); U.S. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist; Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist; Chiaki Mukai, payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agenmcy (NASA); and Scott F. Parazynski, mission specialist. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14549 (June 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., STS-95 payload specialist, works with a blood pressure monitoring experiment during a training exercise at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Sen. Glenn's blood pressure will be taken at several intervals during the orbital portion of the flight, as well as during the launch and entry phases. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14550 (June 1998) --- STS-95 crew members work with navigational hardware which will be used during Discovery's operations with the STS-95 free-flying Spartan payload. From the left are astronauts Curtis L. Brown, mission commander; Stephen K. Robinson and Scott F. Parazynski, both mission specialists; and Steven Lindsey, pilot. The photo was taqken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14551 (June 1998) --- Seated on the flight deck of the crew compartment trainer (CCT-2)during a training session at the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility are astronauts Stephen Lindsey, pilot; Pedro Duque (background), mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA); and Scott F. Parazynski, misison specialist. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14552 (June 1998) --- Five members of the STS-95 crew await the start of a training exercise on the mid deck of the full fuselage trainer at the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility. From the left are Steven Lindsey, pilot; Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA); Chiaki Mukai, payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA); Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist; and U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist. Not pictured were astronauts Curtis L. Brown, mission commander; and Scott F. Parazynski, mission specialist. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14554 (July 1998) --- At the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility, several STS-95 crew members get a close look at the new generation fold-up seat like those to be used aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery for the scheduled Oct. 29 launch. In the center and right foreground are astronauts Steven Lindsey, pilot, and Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist Others, from the left, are U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist who will be seated in the mid deck for both Discovery's ascent and descent stages; astronaut Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA;) and A. Flagler, who gave a brief demonstration of the seat. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-95 Shuttle Mission ...
2004-04-03 0:0:0
 
Description S98-14552 (June 1998) --- Five members of the STS-95 crew await the start of a training exercise on the mid deck of the full fuselage trainer at the Johnson Space Center's systems integration facility. From the left are Steven Lindsey, pilot; Pedro Duque, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA); Chiaki Mukai, payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA); Stephen K. Robinson, mission specialist; and U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist. Not pictured were astronauts Curtis L. Brown, mission commander; and Scott F. Parazynski, mission specialist. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14560 (July 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., STS-95 payload specialist, checks out a seat for a T-38 jet trainer during a training session at Ellington Field in preparation for a flight in one of the aircraft. He is assisted by pilot David L. Mumme. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14559 (July 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., STS-95 payload specialist, tries on his recently adjusted helmet during a period of preparation for a schedule flight in the rear station of a NASA T-38 jet trainer. The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA. S98-14556 (July 1998) --- U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr., payload specialist, and other STS-95 crew members (out of frame) are briefed by investigators of a crystal growth experiment to be carried aboard the Discovery for the STS-95 mission. This training took place in the flight operations facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The photo was taken by Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA.
STS-121 Shuttle Mission...
2006-08-01 0:0:0
 
Description STS121-S-067 (17 July 2006) --- (left to right) William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for Space Operations; Rex Geveden, associate administrator; and Dr. Michael Griffin, NASA administrator, welcome home STS-121 crewmembers--Steven Lindsey, commander; Mark E. Kelly, pilot; and Michael E. Fossum, mission specialist--after the landing of the Space Shuttle Discovery and conclusion of mission STS-121. The crew of seven tested new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
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